Homecoming parade revisits old traditions

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This year an old tradition was revived for Whitworth Homecoming: a parade. For many students Oct. 3 was a new experience, but the Homecoming parade was once a yearly tradition among the Whitworth community. The Associated Students of Whitworth University (ASWU) came up with the idea of a Homecoming parade after looking in old yearbooks from Whitworth’s past.

“The goal is to give the whole cam- pus opportunities to be involved,” ASWU executive vice president Chase Weholt said.

The parade included 10 floats decorated by each dorm community and off-campus students. From a pirate ship to a camping scene, the dorms were creative with their decorations.

President Beck Taylor and his wife Julie were also a part of the Homecoming parade. They rode at the back of the parade in a convertible chauffeured by Ballard and McMillan resident director, Matthew Baker.

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“It’s a reintroduction of an old tradition,” Taylor said.

Taylor was excited about the addition of the homecoming parade as a way for students to be more involved in the Homecoming festivities, he said.

“It’s great to see alumni and current students,” Taylor said.

Some alumni were on campus for Homecoming after being away from Whitworth for decades.

“We love seeing old friends,” said Beth Wentworth-Strickland, class of 1985. The parade was a great way to welcome Whitworth alums back to campus.

“This was a really cool idea,” senior Cass Busch said. “It’s cool to see different people take on decorating their float.”

Students and alumni voted for their favorite float after the parade, which proceeded along the loop road and ended in front of the Hixson Union Building. Each person put a voting slip in the box of their favorite float to vote for the best one. Junior Bailey Vallee helped hand out slips.

“This creates a cool activity for alumni and students to be a part of,” Vallee said. “There is a sense of camaraderie.”

The vote resulted in BMac’s pirate ship taking home the win as the crowd favorite float.

The parade took the place of a Homecoming dance which had been put on for several years. Instead of the dance this year, the committee decided to create an activity that any student could be a part of.

“Not everyone wants to go to a dance,” Weholt said.

The parade allowed students to celebrate Homecoming creatively and inclusively, Weholt said.

 

Melissa Voss

Staff Writer

Contact Melissa Voss at

mvoss19@my.whitworth.edu

Students hypnotized by professional hypnotist during Homecoming week

As part of this week’s Homecoming festivities, Jerry Harris, a noted hypnotist and author came to Whitworth and hypnotized eight willing Whitworth students. The Sept. 30 show was just under two hours and had the audience laughing the whole time.

Harris randomly selected eight eager audience members to go up on stage and be hypnotized.

He also encouraged any other members of the audience to perform the relaxation in order to become hypnotized as well.

A few audience members became hypnotized and Harris gave them a post-hypnotic suggestion which led to them to stand up and chant his name when he introduced himself saying, “My name is Jerry Harris!”

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Many of the volunteers who were hypnotized on stage performed hilarious activities that Harris suggested.

“They respond to suggestions however they feel appropriate,” Harris said.

At one point in the show, volunteers believed that paper napkins were actually $100 bills. Harris convinced the volunteers to store their cash somewhere on their person, which for many, meant straight down their pants.

After the show, sophomore Jake Elder was very confused about the large stash of napkins he had stored in the pockets of his shorts.

“I have no idea why they are there,” Elder said.

Throughout the evening, the volunteers performed as Miley Cyrus and her backup dancers, Russian ballerinas who spoke fluent Russian–or what they believed was Russian–and even strutted their stuff as fashion models.

Freshman Joe Spencer, one of the volunteers, had been hypnotized before.

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“It felt pretty much the same and I remember everything...I knew what was going on,” Spencer said.

Despite being aware while hypnotized, Spencer still responded to Harris’s suggestion that he was “Tinker Bell, King of the Sugarplum Fairies,” a title which he defended by flapping his arms like they were wings.

“It was kind of embarrassing,” Spencer said.

Many students attended the event in order to celebrate homecoming and take a break from studying.

Freshman Dillon King was impressed with the show.

“It was really interesting,” King said. “Hypnotism is different than you think.”

Harris made sure to keep the show PG-13 and respected the volunteers on stage at all times.

“We become a team,” Harris said. “I would never suggest something that I wouldn’t do myself.”

That meant that Harris assured students before the hypnosis that they would not remove any clothing, would replace curse words with foods and would not, under any circumstances, be told to make animal noises.

Harris made the hypnotism process look easy.

He played calming music to relax his subjects and made sure that they main- tained eye contact with him while he slowly talked them through a relaxation exercise. This was meant to encourage their brain to produce alpha waves, which creates an environment similar to the state of mind prior to sleep, Harris said.

“All it is relaxation,” Harris said. “One hour under hypnosis is equivalent to getting eight hours of quality sleep,” Harris said. After their time under hypnosis, the participants verified this statement.

“I really feel well rested,” Elder said, despite the extensive amount of activity he performed, including dancing and singing.

Harris’s career in hypnosis began in 1988 with his wife Linda after he had a major health scare.

“Hypnosis really saved my life,” Harris said.

Hypnosis is medically proven to relieve stress, said Harris, who has authored 24 self-help and hypnotherapy books.

Students believed that the participants were really in a stage of hypnosis as well.

“The brain is so susceptible to anything,” freshman Mae Curtis said. “It’s fun and scary.”

Whitworth students were glad to welcome Harris to campus in order to kick off Homecoming with some “good, clean, quality fun!”

 

Melissa Voss

Staff Writer

Contact Melissa Voss at

mvoss19@my.whitworth.edu

"The Devil is in the Details" exhibit features intricate pieces made from unusual materials

Hana Hetty ManuelaStaff Writer

If you are a detail-oriented person, come and explore the details at the art exhibition “The Devil Is in Details” put on by Whitworth University. As the title suggests, the art exhibition expresses a catch or mysterious element hidden in the details. Photographer: Stuart Beeksma  Anna Osten (left) and Dana Bretch admiring the details in Andy Messerschmidt’s work.

The artists used recycled materials such as bed sheets, blankets, gift-wrap, pillows, rubber bands and even doll house flooring, and transformed the materials into beautiful artworks with deep details.

The collaboration between materials, colors, textures and shapes create the beauty of 17 pieces by artists Benjamin DeMott, Claire Hedden, Elisabeth Higgins O’Connor, Andy Messerschmidt and Joetta Maue.

The opening reception for the exhibition was held in the Bryan Oliver Gallery in the Lied Art Center on Tuesday, Sept. 15, and was attended by students, professors and community members. After attendees viewed the pieces for an hour, the event continued with an artist talk with O’Connor and Messerschmidt.

During the talk, the artists explained their pieces and their creative process. Messerschmidt, who is predominantly a painter, spoke about his inspiration to include gift-wrap, stickers and other ornaments in his artwork.

O’Connor, who creates large animalistic sculptures, said she drew inspiration from the original illustration of Alice in Wonderland that haunted her imagination when she was child. She described the behind-scenes process of her art, and explained about the characteristic of her artwork.

"It becomes mysterious,” O’Connor said. “They are animals, but they are not animals, they are some kind figure, but we don't know who they are."

Ayobami Adedeji, a freshman art student who attended the event, enjoyed and was intrigued by O’Connor’s work.

“I got the idea that the artist is not only painting or using the computer,” Adedeji said. “[The art] is about life.” Adedeji appreciated the exhibition and the artist talk and question and answer session that accompanied it.

“I think this is a nice event for freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors," Adedeji said. "It was creative, different and inspirational.”

Many other students attended the opening event, including junior Mykaela Hendrix.

“I enjoyed the variety of artwork that was presented in the exhibition and I enjoyed that the artists talked about their work,” Hendrix said. “It’s so inspiring.”

For Whitworth students who have interest in art and would like to gain experience, some of the featured artists will teach workshops this fall. Covering a wide range of mediums from clay and sculpture to embroidery, the workshops are open to everyone regardless of skill level.

“The Devil Is in Details” is open until Oct. 30 at the Lied Center for the Visual Arts Bryan Oliver Gallery. It is free and open to the public. Gallery hours: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Saturday

The exhibit is closed on official university holidays. For further information, please call (509) 777-3258.

The Qadim Ensemble promotes unity through music

Melissa Voss Staff Writer

When people think about the Middle East, they first think of the political turmoil that frequents the news. However, On Friday night, Sept. 18, the Qadim Ensemble showed a different perspective of the Middle East that is often overlooked.

The Bay Area-based music group performed ancient, soulful music of the Near East in the HUB Multipurpose room. Their repertoire included music spanning several centuries. From traditional Andalucian music written over 700 years ago to modern Arabic style music incorporating western and flamenco influence, the trio’s array of music was as wide as it was beautiful. Similarly, the band performed music from many Middle Eastern regions: Morocco, Iraq, Yemen and Turkey being among the nations represented.

The Qadim Ensemble offers an important look into the Middle Eastern culture. The trio, comprised of Eliyahu Sills, Bouchaib Abdelhadi and Faisal Zedan, are all from distinctly unique cultural and religious backgrounds, a fact that they were open about throughout their performance. Despite their differences, they come together to make incredible music.

Whitworth senior Marianne Sfeir attended the event and was enthusiastic about the message and the music that the ensemble had to offer to Whitworth students and the world. Due to her half-Arab identity, Sfeir said the music reminded her of back home.

“Given the political conflicts in the Middle East, the common pleasure of music to unite religions in important for the Middle East,” Sfeir said.

The event was put on by the Associated Students of Whitworth University (ASWU) cultural events coordinator, senior Kaysee-Li Tomkins.

“The goal of the event was to destigmatize diversity by showing students how we are all diverse,” Tomkins said. She also lauded the ensemble for their ability to express religion through music, stating that people often overlook religion as something that makes us diverse.

“Everyone is diverse,” Tomkins said. “From race and religions to hair color and eye color.” Tomkins hopes the event helped students to expand their horizons on what it means to be diverse, as well as give them an opportunity to listen to good music.

Not only was their message inspiring, the Qadim Ensemble also provided an exciting performance. The band was very involved with the audience, encouraging them to clap, sing and even dance along to the music. They played numerous exotic Middle Eastern instruments including a Riqq, which is similar to a tambourine, an Oud, the predecessor of guitars, and several reed flutes known as Ney, each with distinctive regional identities.

Photographer: Stuart Beeksma The Qadim Ensemble performs a historic song from Arabic culture during their concert on Friday, Sept. 18.  They play traditional instruments from several Middle Eastern countries. Photographer: Stuart Beeksma  

In Arabic, Hebrew, Farsi and Turkish, the word Qadim means “ancient,” but it is also commonly taken to mean “moving forward”, Sills said. The ensemble embodied this meaning in their artful of ancient music and instrument, making music that connects the past with their goal of moving forward into the future, as well as providing a picture of global unity through the increasingly divided world of the Middle East.