"Is Jesus a Pacifist?" follows "God and Guns"

After the "God and Guns" panel in February, a group of small group coordinators wanted to continue the conversation by creating the “Is Jesus a Pacifist?” panel. The panel was more theology based than “God and Guns.” During the panel, audience members texted questions to a number projected behind the panelists. The panelists were sophomore Andrew Langbehn, Provost Carol Simon and Director of Church Engagement Terry McGonigal. Langbehn served in the military for six and a half years and since then his position on pacifism has evolved. He went into the military in 2008. In the military he had an identity crisis, but Christ became his identity which changed his perspective, Langbehn said.

“As a Christian I had to look hard at what I was participating in and see if that was for the interest of America or actually for the global human interest,” Langbehn said.

Langbehn accepted principles of Just War theory without knowing it when faced with operations and tasks, he said.

Just War theory was a practice used by early Christians to determine whether a war was just. Some principles of the theory included determining if military involvement was necessary to put an end to the slaughter of innocent people and if nothing else could solve conflict.

He had to come to terms with whether he was trying to put an end to the violence or furthering the violence, Langbehn said.

“In my position I would say use the just war theory,” Langbehn said. “And principles of that to approach situations, to approach wars.”

Simon agreed with Langbehn’s use of the Just War theory but said she doubts someone can know if they are using it correctly.

Just War theory was developed as a way for Christian leaders to know when and how they should seek military solutions to conflict, Simon said. In most times, however, people had no choice whether or not to participate in the military.

“As a Christian I find the view of that I will call modern military pacifism compelling,” Simon said. “As an ordinary citizen I have no way of knowing if officials have tried every other way.”

McGonigal recalled his discussion with a friend of his who is a military chaplain who had been involved in multiple combat situations. There is a lot of violence in the Bible and some justifies violence, McGonigal said. The military chaplain said that Christians who think in the way that the culture has given them is frustrating because it creates a binary thinking, McGonigal said.

In Joshua 5, before the people of Israel escape oppression in Egypt, Joshua is leading the people across. When he sees someone holding a sword, Joshua asks “are you with us or against us or are you for us?”, McGonigal said. The person responds with “Neither. I am the commander of the army of the lord”.

“Joshua came with a binary,” McGonigal said. “Are you with us or against us?”

Sophomore Clare Newell found the perspectives from the panelists on the relationship between violence, pacifism and Jesus interesting.

“The stories and personal anecdotes from what they’ve learned from other people was really interesting,” Newell said. “Particularly, I liked the story McGonigal shared of how Mennonites define pacifism a little bit differently.”

Sophomore Eric Espinoza said his biggest takeaway was that there were lots of references to violence in the Bible.

“We’re talking a lot [in Nonviolent Defense] about how love fosters movements for change. If you go based on love, you can change a person’s heart. The idea that Jesus Christ faced so much and suffered is interesting. He could have defended himself but he didn’t, he didn't avoid it because he knew in order to teach his people [his oppressors] he needed to endure torment.”

 

Krystiana Morales

Staff Writer

Contact Krystiana at kmorales17@my.whitworth.edu

Over 200 students attend Second Chance Prom dance

On Saturday night over 200 Whitworth students traveled to the historic Bozarth Mansion and Retreat Center, to attend “Second Chance Prom.” The event was sponsored by ASWU. The Bozarth Mansion was purchased by Gonzaga University in 1963 and is now an event center. Sophomores Scott Bingham and Madeline Misterek enjoyed the ambiance of the location and the dancing.

“It’s wonderful here, I love the vintage feel of the mansion, and we got to see the sunset right when we got here,” Misterek said. “There are lots of great people, and it’s a fun place because we even got to go outside and dance too.”

The two especially enjoyed getting to dance to the Wobble and the Stanky Leg.

“I like the wobble because there’s already moves, so I don’t have to come up with my own, and I am not very good at dancing so that’s nice,” Misterek said. “We even looked up a YouTube video and our instructor, Randy was his name, taught us how to do the Stanky Leg.”

“We were actually practicing the Stanky Leg just for this night, so we could get our groove on," Bingham said. Bingham and Misterek both hope to see this event or events like it continued on in the future.

“Its nice to have it off campus,  but still close by,” Misterek said.

Freshman Christina Locatelli also attended the dance and enjoyed being at such a unique location with so many people.

“I think it has been fun, there are a lot of people here. I was surprised,” Locatelli said. “It's beautiful, it’s a great location, gorgeous view and gorgeous building.”

The event was planned by several dorm senators and ASWU special events coordinator Bre Lyons. Sophomore and Boppell senator Norma Heredia helped plan and set up for the event.

“It’s so great to see the students having fun, looking beautiful, and especially seeing how the year is going to be over and finals are coming up and the stress level is soon going to go up," Heredia said.

The historic location and the free event attracted many students both from on and off-campus.

“The minute I walked in, all I heard was positive reviews,” Heredia said. "I am just glad to see everybody all dressed up, and looking happy, because that was the original intent.”

Another student integral in planning the dance was sophomore Ballard senator Rachel Henson.

“We realized that students really like having bigger dances and off campus events, especially the on campus students, because they don’t always have opportunities to get off for Whitworth-sponsored events, so a whole group of ASWU dorm senators came together and decided it was something we wanted to do,” Henson said.

There have been off-campus dances in recent years, but this is the first time in three years that “prom” was brought back and the first time having a Whitworth event at the Bozarth Mansion.

Thanks to the work of the dorm senators and Lyons, the event was subsidized by ASWU and was free of charge for students.

 

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

"The Space Between" showcases senior art

Last Tuesday marked the opening day for the 2016 senior exhibition, “The Space Between.” Located in the Bryan Oliver gallery inside of the Lied Arts Center, "The Space Between" exhibit is a compilation of works from Whitworth senior visual art students. The show features a wide variety of projects, including a wire installation, graphic designs, screen prints, paintings, photographs and even an artist book. Before graduating seniors are asked to come up with a final project that reflects both their time at Whitworth and their chosen field of study.

Senior art and psychology major Christina Dobbins prepared a four-panel mixed media work, a painted photograph of a bustling city on canvas. Using a photograph and a gel medium, Dobbins transferred the black and white photo to the canvases and then painted over selected parts of the image with oil paint.

“I am from the San Francisco area, California, so I came up with the idea from some pictures I took of street life when I was home,” Dobbins said. “I really like the busyness of cities, and the diversity of people in them, and so that's where I got the idea.”

Dobbins' work is neither fully a photograph nor fully a painting, but rather it is a unique combination.

Senior Britney Baker chose to share both her love for photography and for her older sister. For her project, she displayed a series of photographs that she took of her sister and her husband titled, “The Story of Them.”

“The pictures on the wall is a storyline of my sister and the few big moments that have happened in her life so far, her getting engaged, her newborn pictures and having her first child.”

Additionally, Baker put together a book of photographs she has taken that the viewer is invited to flip through to experience her style of photography.

“The book is a compilation of all the things I have been recently working on,” Baker said. “I wanted the book to be a product I would be able to show to clients in the future.”

Senior Jeff Skaggs’ work “Aging Process” is made of six similar but slightly different labels on aging bottles of wine, to show the evolution of his knowledge and skills as a graphic design major and his aging process.

“My work...is my reflection on the change throughout my collegiate career, a change as a person, and now I am getting ready to enter the workforce and what we would classify as the ‘real world,’” Skaggs said. “It’s a change and a progression, so it’s an aging process, and that’s why I labeled it that.”

The faculty in the art department work to equip and discuss with their students the reality of life after college, but not without presenting some healthy challenges for them along the way.

Dobbins’ challenge has been juggling a psychology and art major, and trying to navigate life after Whitworth.

“I’m a psychology and art major, so it has been interesting trying to balance the two, and figuring out what I want to do,” Dobbins said. “We have some really good professors, that are always willing to help talk through things and come up with ideas, so that’s been really helpful.”

Growing as an artist and a person at Whitworth has proven to be sometimes difficult for Baker.

“It’s definitely been a bumpy road at times, I have learned a lot about myself,” Baker said. “[The professors] really push you to do your best and they push you sometimes when you don’t want to be pushed, but they do anyways, and I am better artist because of that.”

Skaggs has been challenged to grow his knowledge in areas beyond his major and. “I have felt really happy here at Whitworth,” Skaggs said. “I am really thankful that I didn't just spend all my time dedicated in one specific area, because then I feel like I wouldn’t have had the knowledge and skills to apply other areas into my work.”

The artwork of these seniors and their classmates will be on display in the Bryan Oliver Gallery from now until May 21.

 

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Freshman Jira Hammond interprets senior Annie Feuerstein’s piece titled “Set Time, Face Self”.

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

"Ask a Neighbor" series gives students an opportunity to learn about other faiths

Students gathered Tuesday night in the HUB Multipurpose Room for the “Ask a Neighbor” discussion, an opportunity for students to engage in an interfaith dialogue with Darrell Moseley, Spokane Washington Stake President for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Moseley joined the church at age 18, and has since then become a leader in the church.

Moseley was chosen to be a stake president last June. As a stake president, Moseley is the leader of the Spokane wards, which are congregations grouped together geographically.

The students in attendance asked Moseley questions and listened as he shared the beliefs and practices of his church.

The conversation covered a wide range of topics relevant to the Latter-day Saints faith including ward boundaries, drinking caffeine, gender roles in the church, diversity, missions, scripture and more. One audience member asked Moseley to talk about the temple of their church.

“We look at the temple as another place of worship,” Moseley said. “It’s reserved; not all members of the church can go there, only those who pay the highest devotions to the church, who are in tune with everything the church is doing, obeying all the commandments, and the covenants, are welcome to go in the temple.”

Moseley later explained that temple access is determined through an interview process with a bishop and stake president of the church. Members who meet the requirements are given a temple recommend card, which gives them access to the temple for two years assuming they stay true to the commandments.

“The gospel of Jesus Christ is all about repentance,” Moseley said. “If someone does something wrong that would cause them to lose their temple recommend, they should go to their bishop, who would work through the repentance process with them and get them back their temple recommend.”

The discussion was the first event of the “Know your Neighbors” interfaith dialogue series launched this spring. The series allows Whitworth students to actively engage with people of other faiths from around the Spokane community.

The event is coordinated by Ross Watts, Whitworth director of service learning and community engagement, and campus pastor Mindy Smith.

“One of things that we were interested to do was to create a space on campus where students could learn a little bit about other faiths because that might reduce some of the fear of the unknown,” Watts said.

The long-term plan for the series is that students will begin with “Ask a Neighbor,” which are on-campus discussions with people of other faiths from churches around the Spokane community, and then attend “Meet your Neighbors,” events with the Spokane Interfaith Council, which offers open houses at places of worship around Spokane, and then finally “Be a Neighbor,” which would ask students to complete a service project with people of different faiths.

“The series is a set of opportunities for Whitworth students to engage with somebody from a different faith and become comfortable around them,” Watts said. The next “Ask a Neighbor” discussion will be Tuesday, April 19, at 8 a.m. in the HUB chambers. Students will have the chance to speak with Amer Ahmed, an intercultural diversity consultant, about his Islamic faith.

 

Contact Kailee Carneau at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

Diversity Monologues: What is a community?

Robinson Teaching Theatre was filled with tears, laughter and applause March 31 as students shared personal monologues on how they come to know community. The Diversity Monologues were established by the Director of Diversity Initiatives and Social Justice Michael Benitez Jr. at Dickinson College. The monologues were created in order to showcase the talents of students while calling attention to issues of diversity and social justice, according to speakoutnow.org. Benitez is currently the dean of diversity and inclusion and the chief officer diversity at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington.

The monologues began with an introduction from President Beck Taylor. Taylor referred to Whitworth’s mission statement which states, “The University’s mission is to provide its diverse student body an education of the mind and the heart, equipping its graduates to honor God, follow Christ, and serve humanity.” To be Christian means to be radically inclusive. To be Christian means to see ourselves as a part of a larger tapestry of human creation, Taylor said.

Coordinator for Diversity, Equity & Inclusive Ministries Stephanie Nobles-Beans prayed with the audience and for the students who shared their monologues before introducing David Garcia, assistant director of diversity, equity and inclusion. Garcia thanked some of the forty individuals who played a role in putting the event together.

Benitez introduced the students sharing their monologues and provided commentary on issues of diversity, equity and inclusion in between student performances. Benitez also shared some of his own poetry.

Senior Marianne Sfeir was the first student to share her monologue, “Tired: Reflection of a Lebanese-American.” Sfeir is from Beirut, Lebanon which has suffered from the ramifications of a religious civil war, she said.

“Politics, religion, war,” Sfeir said “These three words were the axis of my world. They told me who I was and who I am and who I am is Lebanese.”

Junior Emily Thorpe thinks diversity is about more than people’s race or ethnicity, which is a factor of diversity, but it is also about people’s experiences.

“No two people have the same story and no two people see the world in the same way,” Thorpe said. “So I think that’s what diversity means to me.”

Sfeir said that she’s tired of the sectarianism in Lebanon, which divides people who hate and use that hate in the name of God. She’s tired of the division that is created by the language of people, Sfeir. She came to the United States hoping to find something different. But she was disappointed, Sfeir said.

“In China they created this great wall,” Sfeir said. “In America this great wall is called 'eamana' for which the English translation is blindness.”

Blindness is a system that glorifies winners and losers, Sfeir said. It is calling others too sensitive when you have not taken the time to listen, Sfeir said.

“Community is when a human being looks into the eyes of another human being and doesn’t stop at the divisions created by politics, religion, war,” Sfeir said. “But with humility acknowledges their blindness and says, ‘please teach me more’.”

Freshman Olyvia Salter shared her monologue “The Art of Storytelling” about the elders of her family as well as the individuals who helped motivate her goals and dreams which include artists, writers and family members.

“I stand on the shoulders of giants. A foster child and militaristic man are my parents. A bipolar published poet is my aunt and a recovered addict is my grandmother,” Salter said. “I am a product of survival.”

Her habitat does not shape who she is but it creates knowledge and understanding, Salter said. She wants to use that knowledge to conform hearts and use her education, love, respect and creativity to reconstruct society, she said. She loves to converse with the older generation and the stories they tell, which may fall on their last set of ears, Salter said.

“I stand on the shoulders of giants. A believer and a war veteran are my parents. A social activist is my aunt. A caregiver is my grandmother,” Salter said. “I am a product of survival.”

The best part about the monologues was hearing from each individual, Thorpe said.

“It is so incredible that even though everyone was given the same prompt, each performance was completely different than the one before it.”

Literary Live Action Clue

A quarter after 7 p.m. last Friday night, about 20 students pulled out their magnifying glasses and detective hats and started searching for clues around the halls of Westminster. Westminster Round hosted the event, and brought the board game to life.  Before the event, Westminster Round members hid cards with names of literary characters, places and weapons around the rooms of Westminster.

Teams of students had seven minutes in each of the eight  rooms to find the cards. Teams could also re-hide cards once they found them and come up with their own team names.

“I’m pretty proud of the one I put in the hand sanitizer dispenser,” junior Lydia Pierson said, a member of the winning team.

Senior Vanessa Henzler said she liked the event because it’s fun to search, find and hide things.

“In elementary school, I was playing hide and seek with my brother and babysitter, and I hid in a shirt rack, behind the shirts,” Henzler said. “I knew at that moment, 'I’m pretty good at this.'”

Although Henzler’s team didn’t win, the “Sneaky Sleuths” was one of the teams to find the most clues. The team “Mystery Machine” guessed two out of three of the right answers.

This was the fourth annual Literary Live Action Clue, said senior Katie Cunningham, Westminster Round president. There have been small refinements made to the game over the years, like designing and printing nicer clue cards and allowing all teams to move the cards in the rooms. Theming the rooms was also not part of the original game.

Each classroom had an image projected on the screen and music playing that fit a certain theme. One room had the character and music from “The Shining,” while another was decorated as the Room of Requirement from “Harry Potter.”

Cunningham and the rest of the Westminster Round team came up with the names for the characters, weapons and rooms.

“We had one meeting where we just hung out in a classroom [to come up with the names]; everyone just shouts stuff out and we vote on what we want to use,” Cunningham said. “It only took about 30 minutes.”

One character card featured “Stately, plump Buck Mulligan,” the first line of the novel “Ulysses,” which is the focus of a class many English majors are currently taking.

“It’s fun because the stuff that we use is kind of reflective of what people are reading in the department that year,” Cunningham said. “In English we have a lot of events that happen every year, but they’re also fresh because different people are reading different books.”

Students got familiar with the department building as well as the reading list.

“Checking out the computers, the white board, creates a relationship with the space and department and breaks down boundaries,” Cunningham said. “I think when you come back to school [after the event] it makes you feel more comfortable with the spaces.”

"Enchanted April" has successful opening weekend

This weekend marked the kick off of Whitworth Theatre’s spring production, “Enchanted April.” The play is a romantic comedy, centered around two housewives from London who vacation in Italy. As the story unfolds, the two of them get more out of the vacation than either could have anticipated. Performances were on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. The Friday showing was incorporated into Whitworth’s semi-annual Faculty Development Day. The faculty joined one another for dinner and were invited to see the show altogether Friday evening. Many of the faculty stayed to enjoy the show along with other members of the community, and Whitworth students.

Amongst the crowd was Stacy Keogh-George, assistant professor of sociology.

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“It was great, the set was beautiful, the students did an amazing job,” Keogh-George said.

The two main characters, Lottie Wilkins and Rose Arbuthnot, are played by juniors Michela Munoz and Alanna Hamilton.

“It was funny, there were parts that were really sad, the characters had really sad stories to tell, so it was fun to see them develop throughout the play,” George said. “I got really involved with a couple of the characters, they did a great job connecting with the audience.”

Many hours of design and practice have been put into the production. Typically, the cast has been rehearsing six days a week, for three to four hours a day, since the start of spring term. Aaron Dyszelski, a fifth year professor of theater design and tech, has been one of the many people putting a lot of time in to help bring the play to fruition. Dyszelski is heading up costume and set design for “Enchanted April.”

“I think it’s not a well known-script, so people aren’t sure what to expect, but it’s got a little bit of everything, it’s funny, there some serious moments, Dyszelski said. “All the characters are real people dealing with real problems.”

The production is guest directed by Jadd Davis, Artistic Director for Coeur d'Alene Summer Theatre. This is his first production with Whitworth, but he has acted and directed on many other occasions for local theaters.

The show’s final weekend  is March 11 and 12. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. both evenings in Cowles Auditorium and runs about two hours. Whitworth students get in free with student I.D.

Kailee Carneau

Staff Writer

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

The writer's life

Junior Josh Tuttle, an English major on the writing and literature tracks and computer science minor, has been passionate about writing from a young age. After learning the alphabet as a child, Tuttle used to type on his family's old typewriter. “I have always wanted to be a writer; the problem was when you’re a little kid, the challenge of being a writer isn’t necessarily the writing, it’s having something to say,” Tuttle said. “I didn’t have anything to say, because I hadn’t had the right experiences to have anything to say.”

Tuttle has come a long way since his typewriter days and over time has found many things to say. “Eventually I got older, and you both get more life experiences, and with practice, you get more facility with language and writing, and mental stamina,” Tuttle said.

Last year, Tuttle won the Washington Consortium for the Liberal Arts essay contest and will have one of his short stories published in an anthology entitled “Songs of My Selfie,” a collection of 17 short stories by millennial fiction writers.

“I had always wanted to get a short story published and I hadn’t been able to yet, so that was why I was so excited to hear that it was going to be published," Tuttle said.

Tuttle’s soon-to-be published short story is a fictional work; however, that may not be the writing style he continues to pursue.

“I feel a bit unmoored right now,” Tuttle said. “I sort of stumbled upon creative non-fiction, and I think that will probably end up being more of my thing. That does make me a little sad, because I really wanted to be a fiction writer, but I've discovered that I like creative non-fiction more.”

Before coming to Whitworth, Tuttle served in the army for two and a half years, where he worked as an Abrams crewman and a Stryker Mobile Gun System crewman.

“I picked up a book when I was in the Army called "Reading Like a Writer," by a woman named Francine Pros,” Tuttle said. “I picked it up and it sounded interesting, because I had always wanted to be a writer. The book was fantastic, and that was the first time that I ever really felt like I could see the path forward.”

After the Army, Tuttle attended De Anza community college (CA), where his writing professor, Charles Gray, reminded him of how much he enjoyed being in an English class environment.

“I loved the environment so much,” Tuttle said. “Without that experience, I really don’t think that I would have had the necessary insight to want to come to a place like Whitworth, where I would be in a good place to explore that side of things, so I owe a lot to him.”

After attending De Anza, Tuttle eventually transferred to Whitworth, where he was drawn to the English department.

“I came to Whitworth to be a computer science major, because I wanted to work for Microsoft,” Tuttle said. “I also wanted to explore the writing side [of myself], and I figured my opportunity to do that would be better served at a liberal arts university than some state school. And I was right. Our writing program, on the creative writing side, is just fantastic.”

There has been no single person of inspiration for Tuttle, but rather a whole department of support.

“Our professors are so supportive and so wonderful, after coming from places like the Army and De Anza College,” Tuttle said. “Just the personal relationships with these professors, I don’t think I could name anyone in [Whitworth’s] English department, that I haven’t had something like that with.”

“Songs of My Selfie,” the anthology featuring Tuttle’s short story, will be available in print by April 5.

 

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

History: A black perspective

Courses that include narratives of historically marginalized groups are offered as electives and not part of core curriculum, said Kellie Carter Jackson, Ph.D. Members of the Whitworth community gathered Feb. 23 to listen to Jackson speak on why black perspectives matter in history.Jackson is a 19th-century historian and was a Harvard College Fellow in the department of African & African American studies before she became a history professor at Hunter College, City University of New York. For students who do not study history, the African American figures that they recognize are limited to maybe two per century, which is a problem, Jackson said. “I’m always asking students, pay attention to perspective,” Jackson said. “Pay attention to what’s being included. Pay attention to what’s not being included.” Jackson gave a brief overview of the black perspective of history. Instead of speaking about the Atlantic slave trade, Jackson spoke about Mansa Musa. Musa was not only the richest African to ever live, but the richest person. Yet, students often do not learn about the kingdoms of Africa before colonization began, Jackson said. Several presidents of the country were slaveholders who made their livelihood by owning tobacco plantations, Jackson said. George Washington lived in Virginia, the largest slave-owning colony. By the end of his lifetime he had 300 slaves. “While [George Washington] is fighting for liberty and freedom16 of his slaves run away and he sends out slave catchers to find them,” Jackson said. “While he’s fighting for liberty and freedom he’s hiring slave catchers to bring back his slaves.” Jackson spoke about the Haitian revolution and how it is rarely discussed. Those enslaved in Haiti started a rebellion to overturn slavery and they won. That was a transformative moment because slaves fought against their enslavement and won freedom for themselves, Jackson said. How they fought and how the Haitian slaves fought to create the first black nation spread throughout the Western Hemisphere. “It’s the only revolution because they actually free their slaves. They actually abolish slavery,” Jackson said. Junior Austriauna Brooks attended the event because she was interested in hearing a black woman’s perspective since it is usually the male perspective. “I think a lot of people are going to leave mad,” Brooks said. “You know, there are a couple things that people can do with that. One, you have a conversation about it with other people who live in this perspective or they’re just going to stay ignorant about things. Some people will take away from the perspective but be passive about the issue at hand.” Jackson also talked about the Underground Railroad and how Harriet Tubman played a crucial role in the railroad, but how William Still was the father of the Underground Railroad. In his lifetime he helped over 800 people, Jackson said. Senior Kamau Chege attended the event because he saw the posters for the lecture around campus and was interested in hearing from Jackson. “I think with most of these things, [people will] come, they’ll listen and then they’ll dismiss it,” Chege said. Skipping to the 19th century, the Plessy v. Ferguson case resulted in the creation of separate but equal legislation. Segregation does not just create separation; it creates a negative connotation with being black and it tells white people that they are special and better, Jackson said. The black doll test implemented by psychologist Kiri Davis in 1954 showed a damaging psychological effect on black children. When black children were presented with a black doll and a white doll and asked which was the bad doll, they pointed to the black one. For all the positive questions asked, the children largely pointed to the white doll and pointed to the black doll for all the negatives questions asked. “It’s so disturbing because even at a young age…you don’t have to tell students, you don’t have to tell children who’s the smart race, who’s the pretty race because every sign is pointing to them,” Jackson said. “And it shows the damages of being white and the damages of being black.” Since apps like Yik Yak give users the opportunity to stay anonymous, ignorance in the Whitworth community is shown, Brooks said. People are comfortable with that anonymity. However, students didn’t engage with a student leader last year to talk about the conversations around a sit-in that several students held when that conversation was offered. “Whenever [Whitworth students]  have to be uncomfortable with conversations like this, that’s something that they don’t want to do,” Chege said. "Either they don’t have that conversation to begin with or quickly change the subject.”

 

Krystiana Morales Staff Writer

Contact Krystiana at kmorales17@my.whitworth.edu

Understanding the refugee crisis

Whitworth students and other members of the Spokane community filled the Robinson Teaching Theatre last Wednesday night for a Q&A panel discussion centered around the topic of the Syrian refugee crisis.The panel consisted of six individual panelists, each bringing different perspectives on the issue and different levels of experience with refugees. Three of the panelists work with World Relief, an organization that helps settle and integrate refugees after they arrive in a new country. Among them were professor of political science and environmental studies at Gonzaga University Jon Isacoff and sociology professor Raja Tanas. The final panelist sharing her insight was Bushra Alshalah, a civil engineer and refugee from Iraq. The event was organized by senior Juliana Zajicek, who wanted to provide an opportunity for open dialogue around the subject. “There is a lot of hype and commotion right now about Syria, the Middle East and the refugee crisis,” Zajicek said. “I really wanted to carve out a space for our community to talk about it.” The session began with a brief introduction on what the Syrian refugee crisis is and how it affects people by Myron Jespersen, the Middle East program director for World Relief. “The one takeaway I hope that you have, if you don’t understand the situation already, is that it is an incredibly complex situation and there isn’t a simple fix,”  Jespersen said. Each panelist opened with a description of themselves and the aspects of the Middle Eastern refugee crisis that are important to them. Alshalah spoke of her transition from Iraq to the United States. “It’s a big risk to stay there, and a big challenge to come here,” Alshalah said. “My decision [was] to come here, to be more safe and to protect my family.” Mark Kadel, director of Spokane's World Relief office, followed up with some statistics on refugees. “Out of nearly 20 million refugees in the world today, the United States resettles less than one half of one percent,” Kadel said. “The average length of time that a refugee is in a refugee camp, before having an opportunity for a solution is 17 years.” The rest of the time was left open for the audience to ask the panelists questions about the crisis and the work World Relief is doing in Spokane. One audience member asked how big a community needs to be and what resources it needs in order to sustain Middle Eastern refugees. “How many? Well, if you drive between Spokane and Seattle, how many communities do you meet?" Tanas said. "There’s Ritzville, there’s Moses Lake, Ellensburg, and the rest of Washington state is vacant." Washington has the space and resources to accept refugees, Tanas said. Kadel followed up Tanas’s comment with some information on the government regulations on refugees. “This year, because of the staggering refugee crisis around the world, the greatest crisis since World War II, Obama set that cap at 85,000 [refugees], and out of that 85,000, up to 10,000 of them can be from the country of Syria,” Kadel said. World Relief and other like-minded organizations have petitioned the state and national governments to increase the number of foreign refugees to be over 85,000. Several panel members mentioned education was a key step toward both alleviating the crisis and correcting any misconceptions people may have about it. “I think the answer to your question is education,” Tanas said. “Education, information, there’s so much misinformation via the media, the social media especially, and our leaders, some of them give us false information.” Kadel had similar sentiments about education. “The best thing to do is to educate yourselves and make sure you are giving the right information when you’re having discussions with people,” Kadel said. Those interested in knowing more about World Relief or working with them locally in and around Spokane should contact Johnna Nickoloff at jnickoloff@wr.org or visit www.worldrelief.org/spokane. Those interested in learning more about the Middle East should contact the Middle East Club, which is open to new members. For more information about Middle East Club, contact Catherine Rishmawi at crishmawi18@whitworth.edu.

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

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Contact Kailee Carneau at kcarneau@my.whitworth.edu

Living with autism

Students, faculty, local educators and community members gathered in Cowles Auditorium on Friday for a collaborative presentation titled “The World Needs All Kinds of Minds,” hosted by Whitworth’s Center for Gifted Education and the university’s special education department. Among the five presenters was autism and animal welfare activist, Temple Grandin, Ph.D.The main focus of the event was to “provide strategies and practices to address the range of diverse needs of students,” according to event posters. Specifically, the presentation focused on twice-exceptional students: “students who are cognitively advanced, yet their talents may be overlooked due to a disability-often ADHD or an autism spectrum disorder,” according to the event posters. “Temple is coming to provide educators knowledge about the ways that other kinds of kids think, [because] sometimes we think they think all alike, in the same way, and they don’t, and what she worries about is that students sometimes who are on the [autism] spectrum won’t have their talent developed, and many of them will have talent areas that they absolutely adore," said Jann Leppien, the Margo Long Chair of gifted education and event coordinator. “Rather than fixing the child, putting a focus on the strength of the child. So that’s really what the conference is about for educators. The why is to bring recognition to the neurodiversity of the mind.” Grandin is currently a professor at Colorado State University, and remains an active advocate for both animal welfare and students with disabilities. As an individual with autism, Temple presented her perspective on helping students who are on the spectrum, and the value of all different kinds of minds. “Different kinds of people have different kinds of skills, like some people are visual thinkers–they’re very good at art and design,” Grandin said. “Other people are more the engineering and mathematical minded. You take a product like the iPhone: Steve jobs was an artist; he designed the interface, the more mathematically inclined engineers had to make it work, so when you swipe this and swipe this, it would actually work. That’s an example of needing the different kinds of minds.” Approximately 300 educators came from around the Spokane area, and 250 students and faculty signed up for the day-long event. Grandin also spoke Friday evening, at North Central High School to a crowd of about 500 people. This presentation was called “Helping Different Kinds of Minds Be Successful.” “This is really about different kinds of minds and how they can be successful and the focus is on families, who have kids on the spectrum, and how to help their child be successful,” Leppien said. The Robinson Teaching Theatre was filled to capacity for Grandin’s final presentation, “Understanding Animal Behavior.” Approximately 250 people came to listen to Grandin speak. Among them were local farmers, cattlemen, FFA (Future Farmers of America) and 4-H kids. In two days, over 1,000 people heard Grandin present. “The reason she is so doggone popular is she is one of the very first people that spoke out about being on the [autism] spectrum, and being bright, and that it is not such a disability, it’s actually a gift,” Leppien said. Grandin and Leppien first met at a conference 20 years ago where Leppien was speaking about kids advanced for their grade and Grandin was speaking about children on the autism spectrum. Since then, Leppien has invited Grandin to numerous conferences. Leppien works in Whitworth’s Center for Gifted education, which works with students, educators and the university’s special education department to navigate the complexities of students who are on the spectrum or have disabilities, but are also very bright. “Life is too hard to have people beating us up for what we can’t do,” Leppien said. “I’d rather we spend our time on what we can do, and so we have a tendency to be very strengths-based, what are you good at, what do you love, make that your life goal.” Grandin mentioned the tendency for people to look at what others can’t do repeatedly during “The World Needs all Different Kinds of Minds”. “I want you thinking about this; people get too hung up on the labels, the words of the label,” Grandin said. “We've got to start looking at what a kid can do. I want to see kids be everything that they can be, we've got to emphasize what the kid can do, build up on areas of strengths.” “My favorite overarching theme of her presentation was getting rid of the labels, and just really practicing inclusion, thinking more about the individual, instead of their diagnosis,” junior elementary education major Kendall Todd said. Grandin discussed the different types of thinking and processing. She discussed bottom-up versus top-down processing, auditory versus visual thinkers, and best practices for teaching. “I sometimes see way too much of that in education; they want to ram every kid into the same theory and that doesn’t work,” Grandin said. “You see the thing is, one size doesn’t fit all. I want to see kids that think differently, to be successful and get into good careers.” There are many resources available online for people looking for more information about Grandin and her work. Grandin has also written books, her most recent book being “The Autistic Brain,” which talks about the neurological differences of people with autism and how to best nourish those differences. Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Contact Kailee Carneau at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

"God and Guns": Gun control perspectives

Dozens of students filled the HUB multipurpose room to attend the “God and Guns” panel on Feb. 17. Lead by world languages professor Lindy Scott, sociology professor Stacy Keogh-George and political science professor Julia Stronks, the panelists discussed gun control in the United States. Each panelist gave a different perspective on gun control. Scott gave a brief overview of the biblical understanding of how to respond to conflict.For the first three centuries Christians were largely pacifists following Jesus’ teachings. When joining the Roman army, soldiers had to swear allegiance to a Roman god or affirm the deity of the emperor. Because of this, Christians would not join the army, Scott said. Today soldiers do not have to swear allegiance to any God. This begs the question of whether or not Christians should participate in the military, he said. “Although they were pacifists, generally, in the New Testament, there is a conception of the society,” Scott said. While Christians were not active in the military in those times, they were still active members of society, Scott said. In Romans 13, the apostle Paul writes how the diaconates are to fight against evil, which leaves Paul to question what God wants from Christians. When Jews were in captivity in Babylon, they sought to leave but were told to find the shalom of Babylon. Followers of Christ should bring health to society, Scott said. “It’s a tricky balance,” Scott said. “How do people use their faith, practice their faith in ways to heal their country?” Scott said that it is not necessary for believers to arm themselves if they believe in the power of God. The Bible does not talk about the Second Amendment but it does reference swords. In one case, Jesus tells his followers to take the swords, Scott said. In another mission trip, he tells them to leave the swords.  The purpose of the swords is an open question. A Christian response to the political issue of gun control, which usually represents the two extremes in favor or not in favor of the second amendment, is compromise. Misikir Adnew, a freshman from Ethiopia attended the panel. In Ethiopia, gun control is not really discussed, Adnew said. She does not hear a lot of stories of people buying guns for individual use, except for hunting, as guns are largely used only in the military. Keogh-George spoke about guns in society and provided a PowerPoint with statistics on gun ownership. The 2010 general social survey shows that 34 percent of United States citizens own a firearm. When asked why they owned a gun in a 2013 survey, 48 percent polled said for protection, 32 percent said for hunting and 7 percent said for target/sport shooting, according to the presentation. “All of what was discussed was as shock to me to learn because it's a huge contrast from where I'm from,” Adnew said. Keogh-George also provided statistics of gun violence, including mass shootings. A mass shooting is defined as a single shooting incident which kills multiple victims. There were 372 mass shootings worldwide in 2015 which led to 475 deaths and more than 1,800 people injured, Keogh-George said. “That’s pretty scary,” Keogh-George said. “If that number doesn’t scare you that’s probably a product of desensitization we get from the media because we’re hearing about this so often. That’s a pretty significant number.” There is a disproportionality when the percentage of guns owned by U.S. citizens is compared to the percentage of the U.S. in the global population. The U.S. owns 46 percent of the world’s guns while making up 4 percent of the world’s population. “Our country is founded on the right to bear arms,” Keogh-George said. “That’s deeply, deeply embedded in our culture and ideology.” People perceive gun control as a policy to strip them of their guns. That’s not the case, Keogh-George said. Instead, gun control policy focuses on how guns can be used in a safer way in our country. Senior Nicholas Gosselin said he has always felt like gun control is a hot topic. “I agreed with most of what they said but my only questions came around when they were talking about stats and the fact that this is a huge problem because the numbers were low,” Gosselin said. “It seemed like for a large group of people, not even a full percentage of people, are actually hurt or harmed by guns…So why is the topic so controversial as it is?” Stronks spoke about the Second Amendment. In the colonies, Native Americans and people with mental instabilities were not allowed to have guns. Citizens carried guns because of the rural nature of the colonies, Stronks said. There was no law enforcement, so instead citizens had the responsibility to protect the community. Stronks read the second amendment which states, “A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a Free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed”. The language of the Second Amendment has sparked a debate of whether or not U.S. citizens should own guns, considering that we no longer live in a country with a militia, Stronks said. “We [haven’t had] very much Supreme Court guidance on how to interpret the Second Amendment for 200 years,” Stronks said. In the 1970s and 80s as a result of increased violence, partially due to gang violence, individual states started to pass fairly restrictive gun control laws, Stronks said. In 1975 in Washington, D.C., officials passed a law in which residents could only be granted the right to purchase a gun through the approval of the police commissioner. "I have no clear cut view of gun control just because I'm not that exposed to it back home," Adnew said. "I don't want to think the U.S. is more violent but I think that maybe in the U.S. people are more focused on individual rights.” However, a 2008 case in which a former police officer was denied a gun by the police commissioner led to the officer’s arrest for the possession of a gun. The National Rifle Association represented the man in court and the Supreme Court determined that his arrest was illegal because the Washington, D.C. law violated his Second amendment right, Stronks said. Although Supreme Court Justice Scalia said that it is an individual right to own guns, he also said that no rights are absolute, Stronks said. States across the country have laws that reflect their views on gun control. States are responsible for the safety, health and welfare of the people, not the federal government. That is why individual state laws regarding gun control are different. “As a person of faith I believe…in responsible gun control,” Stronks said.

Krystiana Morales Staff Writer

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Contact Krystiana Morales at kmorales17@my.whitworth.edu

"This Whitworth Life" gives Whitworthians a place to share

STU_9797 “Community” is a huge buzz word at Whitworth. However, sometimes parts of the Whitworth community go unnoticed. There are the students, the professors, trustees, the cafeteria workers, custodians and many other staff members who all make up the community. Everyone shares the experience of being at Whitworth, but everyone has different stories that define them.

Sharing these stories is what the third annual “This Whitworth Life: Whitworth’s Untold Stories” strove to do on Wed., Dec 5.

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A project of English professor Nicole Sheets’ Creative Nonfiction class, “This Whitworth Life” was inspired by NPR’s journalistic non-fiction show “This American Life.” In a similar fashion, the goal of the event is to bring together diverse Whitworthians and build community through the sharing of stories.

“We use that word ‘community’ a lot, but this project [is] a way to really contribute and develop that, so we [do] not just know the faces and names, but about people who [are] in our community,” Sheets said.

The event in the MPR drew in a large audience of Whitworthians and community members, including President Beck Taylor. Eight pre-selected students, staff and faculty members shared their stories, often reflecting on past memories full of bittersweetness, vulnerability and grief.

Senior Molly Daniels reflected on childhood summers spent at her grandparents’ cabin, specifically one where her parents planned a pirate-themed trip, complete with wooden raft and their own treasure chests to paint, Daniels said. The memories were nostalgic for her, as the family cabin was sold and she cannot return to relive her memories.

“[My story] touches on how painful it is to remember things that you can’t ever revisit,” Daniels said. “I feel that people don’t talk enough about how painful it is to have those memories and know that you’re never going to have any kind of contact with them again.”

Sheets got the idea for the event after attending a similar one put on by Gonzaga University featuring individuals involved with all different aspects of the school, and wanted to emulate the experience back to Whitworth in order to bring empathy and compassion to our own campus, Sheets said.

“One of the goals too is to have people from a cross section of the university,” Sheets said. “I’ve had a trustee, I’ve had a custodian, there are so many people that work here and are a part of this community that I just don’t know. I benefit from what they do, but I don’t know them and I don’t know anything about them.”

The event is made unique as the stories shared are from Whitworth voices. Everyone has their own unique experiences, but there is the shared experience that comes from all being at Whitworth in one way or another, Daniels said.

“You learn so much about people,” Daniels said. “You learn about the horrible, tragic experiences that they’ve had, or their moments of struggle or the things that have made them as strong as they are today, the things that have affected them.”

Sheets sees the event as an opportunity to look past the assumptions we make about people, and wants those who have heard the stories shared will see that people are far more complex and that there are a lot of details that we do not know about them, Sheets said.

“The idea that what you may think of someone without getting to know them isn’t the correct idea,” Daniels said. “You don’t know what they’ve gone through, you don’t know what’s built them up over the years, and it’s important to hear those stories.”

 

Meghan Foulk

Staff Writer

Contact Meghan Foulk at

meghanfoulk19@my.whitworth.edu

Windstorm damage hits home: For students whose houses damaged in windstorm, crisis not over

Screen Shot 2015-12-12 at 7.22.07 PM Winds just below hurricane level, at 71 mph, swept through the Whitworth community Nov. 17 as students rushed to find shelter on and off campus. The windstorm caused trees to fall in the loop and on power lines, homes and buildings all over Spokane. A total of 90 trees fell on campus and damaged four buildings.

Senior Niehls Ingram was one of several students whose house was damaged during the storm. His was hit by a tree that fell through the roof and into his room.

“I was at my girlfriend’s house and my housemate called me, he sounded really worried,” Ingram said. “I was pretty sure I knew what happened and then he told me that a tree had fallen on our house.”

Ingram and his housemates talked to their landlady after their house was hit by a tree, which dumped insulation into the house and damaged the roof and ceiling.

“She said we couldn’t stay in the house, so I stayed at a friend’s house,” Ingram said. “They didn’t have power but that was okay.”

Ingram’s landlady told him and his roommates that the repairs on their house would not be completed until January. However, she allowed Ingram and his housemates to break the lease early on the damaged house, which allowed them to look for another place to live, Ingram said.

“Luckily, we found a newly renovated house and moved in,” Ingram said. “We didn’t get power until the day before Thanksgiving but we had a place to live.”

Junior Ashley Fitzgerald, a theme house resident, was working at an elementary school during the beginning of the windstorm. She stayed at work longer than usual to make sure that all the children got home. After work, a friend called her and told her that a tree had fallen near her house, Fitzgerald said.

“So, I left work and it usually takes me 10 to 15 minutes to get back on campus,” Fitzgerald said. “That day it took me 45 minutes.”

Fitzgerald’s house was not accessible at all during the day of the windstorm. After getting on campus she went to McMillan Hall and stayed there for most of the storm, Fitzgerald said.

“I told my housemate not to go to the house because it wasn’t safe,” Fitzgerald said. “Plus, I didn’t want to stay there because it was scary. There were power lines that had fallen and I just didn’t feel comfortable being in the house.”

Fitzgerald’s friends invited her into their home to stay over the next couple of days. The next couple of days were rough, Fitzgerald said.

The aftermath of the storm felt chaotic and hectic, Ingram said.

“It’s hard for me to rely on other people but considering the circumstances, I had to,” Ingram said. “After we found our new place, we got settled in and everything calmed down.”

Professors were really understanding of circumstances, especially considering that most of her assignments are online, Fitzgerald said.

“I don’t think we should have had classes that Thursday,” Fitzgerald said. “Who can even focus when all of that’s going on? I don’t think everyone was ready, especially the on-campus people who had to move to other dorms.”

Overall, the Whitworth community responded very well to the windstorm and taking care of students, Fitzgerald said.

“If there was one thing I learned it was that I wished I had renter’s insurance. I learned that the hard way,” Ingram said.

 

 

Krystiana Morales

Staff Writer

Contact Krystiana Morales at

kmorales17@my.whitworth.edu

Unplugged: Boppell Coffeehouse

Boppell Coffeehouse provided students with a relaxing way to decompress before finals week, and saw a large turnout of students. “It’s so lively here,” sophomore Ashley Yang said.

The event, a Boppell tradition, drew students in with the promise of free coffee and student performances.

“Who can say no to free coffee?” Boppell senator Norma Heredia said about why some students came to the event.

Along with the coffee provided by Boppell, the night featured live performances by Whitworth students.

“Whitworth students are always good at wanting to express their talent, which is great because everyone is so talented,” Heredia said.

Karina Dautenhahn, a junior, attended the event in order to support some friends who were showcasing their talents.

“It’s like a talent show,” Dautenhahn said.

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Amidst the rumble of the crowd and the music, the event offered students the ability to learn about the importance of mental illness awareness. Boppell leadership teamed up with the HEAT, Whitworth’s health organization, to put on events simultaneously. The HEAT provided free popcorn, displayed pieces of art and contributed slam poetry to the coffeehouse performances to facilitate discussion about mental health awareness.

Through the help of Off the Page, a poetry club, the HEAT was able to bring in performers for the coffeehouse event who shared slam poetry about the topic. The partnership of the two events provided an atmosphere for students to come and feel comfortable, following the theme of “finding your shalom.”

“The HEAT is doing amazing things on campus and had a truly positive impact on our event,” Heredia said.

Although the recent windstorm caused some setbacks in the advertisement of the event, Boppell was able to recruit many performers for the event.

“It just goes to show how amazing Whitworth is,” Heredia said. “When someone is in need the community comes together to help each other out.”

Unplugged events, such as the Boppell Coffeehouse, provide students an opportunity to showcase their talents in a comfortable atmosphere.

“These kinds of events helped build confidence within the little family that you already have built here,” Heredia said.

Providing a chance for students to either express themselves, or enjoy the talents of others, was the main goal of the event.

“The talent on our campus is just unbelievable,” Yang said. “It is all too great to leave. It’s just really nice, warm and relaxing.”

Boppell residents appreciated the event as well.

“It’s just like Whitworth is one big family,” Heredia said.

Melissa Voss

Staff Writer

Contact Melissa Voss at

mvoss19@my.whitworth.edu

Poetry and Pie: Students gathered for a night of pie and self-expression

The coffee shop opened to students and faculty ready to share stanzas and dessert on Nov. 13 . Students shared their work, with topics ranging from grandfathers to Italian plums to small moments that would be otherwise forgotten.

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On Friday evening students gathered in the Mind and Hearth to share their thoughts and ideas through poetry. Along with poetry, the event hosted by English department club Westminster Round featured blueberry, apple and pumpkin pie.

Senior Hannah Cobb has attended Poetry and Pie three times prior to this year, and has always enjoyed hearing what peers and faculty read, she said.

This year, she read her poetry aloud for the rst time at the event.

“[Reading] was terrifying," Cobb said. I had never done this before...this is me kind of forcing myself out of my comfort zone a little bit to share it.”

Cobb draws inspiration for her poems through moments she notices, she said. Poetry and Pie is a time for her not just to express her thoughts, but to hear everyone else’s, she said.

“I just love hearing what everyone else is thinking,” Cobb said. “I think poems are such an honest re ection of yourself and who you are and what’s going on in your brain.”

Some of the poets touched on serious subjects, but other works brought laughter to the coffee shop. One such poem by English professor Fred Johnson expressed a list of 10 situations a possum might find itself in, which had students chuckling all the way through.

The event also featured poet Cathy Bobb, wife of English professor Vic Bobb, who shared a handful of poems reflecting on tragedies in her life and on her family’s struggles with mental illness.

Freshman Ainsley Detwiler attended the event, and liked Cathy Bobb’s work for the background and depth that she put into her poetry, along with the eerie feeling Detwiler got after hearing some of the poems, Detwiler said. Cathy Bobb’s work also features a favorite, titled “The Politics of Pie,” where Cathy Bobb makes a pie for her family, but continuously eats it, making up excuses for each new helping.

Detwiler was also impressed by the unintimidating atmosphere the audience created.

“It was really relaxed...the people surrounding were very nonjudgmental, if anything they were really encouraging,” Detwiler said. “It was all around very welcoming and cozy and supportive.”

 

Meghan Foulk

Staff Writer

Contact Meghan Foulk at

meghanfoulk19@my.whitworth.edu

Environmental activism through art: "John Holmgren: Selected Works" explores how humans affect the environment

The new art exhibit, "John Holmgren: Selected Works," in the Lied Art Building’s Bryan Oliver Gallery consists of works that encourage students to start a dialogue about their relationship with the world around them.

Artist John Holmgren works at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania where he teaches a variety of courses on photography, mixed media and printmaking. roughout his art career, Holmgren has compiled an extensive portfolio consisting of five main series of work. Holmgren’s selected works at Whitworth portray photographs of the environment in various states of destruction combined with other art media such as screen printing to create works that show many perspectives on a location.

“[Holmgren] explores these places like an archaeologist would,” said senior lecturer and gallery director Lance Sinnema.

The first series of works, titled “Man Camps of North Dakota,” was a collaorative effort between Holmgren and the North Dakota Man Camp Project at the university of North Dakota in Grand Forks. The project documents temporary settlements, called man camps, on the Bakken oil field in North Dakota associated with fracking oil. Holmgren uses photographs from work sites and inkjet prints of archived documents to create pieces that demonstrate what life is like for miners living in these towns.

“Many of them are like ghost towns now,” Holmgren said.

Holmgren’s “Man Camp” project serves as a springboard for discussion about human trends of consumption. The camps depicted exist for the sole purpose of mining oil which is used for human consumption, although they also contain life.

“We need to come to grips with the damage that we are doing to the earth and to people,” Sinnema said. “The camps are not a very sustainable way of living in the same way that reliance on oil and gas is not sustainable.”

Holmgren’s interest in environmentalism was piqued by the dams on the Columbia River near his hometown of Lakewood, Washington. Another of his collections, “River Relations: A Beholder’s Share of the Columbia River Dams,” depicts the dams along the river. Holmgren, in collaboration with artist Nick Conbere, uses photos from the dams and Conbere’s drawings to construct pieces that show the history and the present state of the dams and their impact on the environment.

“We ask how aesthetic relationships can offer compelling ways to consider human constructions that alter natural forces, re-shaping the flow of a river,” Holmgren said.

The gallery also features Holmgren’s work from his collection “District of the Penguins.” This body of work utilizes photographs from Holmgren’s time stationed on the Polar Sea as a member of the U.S. Coast Guard.

“I am reappropriating my own archives of Antarctica,” Holmgren said. “These photos were never really intended to be artwork.”

Holmgren used innovative photography techniques to create intricately layered art.

Holmgren’s art exhibits human impact on the world and works to start a dialogue that may ask questions about how people can work to create change, Sinnema said.

“Today’s students are the ones that really need to lead the charge, to stand up and say we need a change,” Sinnema said. In order to help create a healthier relationship with resources, Sinnema recommended that all people be involved in researching and voting which work to tackle the issues.

Holmgren’s works will be on display until Jan. 29. The gallery is integral to the art department as it provides art students with a place to interact with a variety of art forms and collaborate with artists, Sinnema said.

While on campus during the opening of the art exhibit, Holmgren gave a lecture pertaining to his works and creative process. He also was able to spend some time with art students in constructive critique groups.

“This presents an opportunity for students to have an experience in the arts that is outside of their regular classes,” Sinnema said. “Art is about communication. It is about questioning and raising questions and getting people to start to think about stuff.”

The exhibition is an important part of the community at Whitworth, both in its impact on art students and in its message for students and the world as a whole, Sinnema said.

 

Melissa Voss

Staff Writer

Contact Melissa Voss at

mvoss19@my.whitworth.edu

Students flock to U-Rec for Winter Carnival

A bounce house, bubble ball, an inflatable obstacle course and free popcorn were brought into the University Recreation Center (U-Rec) basketball courts to create a winter carnival aimed at getting students more familiar with the U-Rec facilities. On Friday night, students were invited to visit and familiarize themselves with the U-Rec while having a lot of fun in the process.

“We wanted to bring all of these things into a controlled, safe environment so students could have some fun,” said Todd Sandberg, director of the U-Rec. “There are a lot of activities that students may not particularly participate in just out of hesitation or reservation but hopefully this can reduce some of those anxieties.”

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The carnival featured a crate stacking competition where students were harnessed and had to climb and stack crates on top of each other in the middle of the basketball courts. Many students were eager to try the activity and found it to be an exciting challenge.

“Crate stacking was very hard,” freshman Nate English said.

Freshman Kaitlyn Halsted attended with a group of friends and found the event to be extremely rewarding.

“We have definitely been entertained well,” Halsted said.

Also offered at the carnival was bubble ball, a game which puts students in inflatables and lets them serve as human soccer balls.

“I didn’t know that I needed bubble ball in my life until I tried it,” freshman Joe Spencer said.

Friday’s carnival was the first event of its type hosted by the U-Rec.

“Because it was the first time we’ve ever done this it was really unknown how many students were going to come,” Sandberg said. “I think it has been really successful.”

Sandberg was first presented with the idea of the carnival at a recreation conference at Montana State University over the summer.

“They did something similar and it was really successful, so that spurred the idea,” Sandberg said.

The carnival helped to bring students into the U-Rec who may not usually use the facilities.

“We wanted to do something different and try to reach all students to bring them into the U-Rec,” Sandberg said.

Students were provided with information about the programs put on by the U-Rec, including Outdoor Recreation activities, while at the carnival.

“Hopefully we can get them on to the climbing wall or out into intramurals,” Sandberg said.

Along with providing a free, fun Friday night event, Sandberg hopes that the carnival helped alleviate some people’s fears about using the rec center.

“The U-Rec shouldn’t be intimidating,” Sandberg said. “Ultimately, about two-thirds of the student population come in here for one reason or another but our goal is always to bring more people in.”

 

Melissa Voss

Staff Writer

Contact Melissa Voss at

mvoss19@my.whitworth.edu

Magazine industry: Senior editor of WIRED speaks on the evolution of magazines

Peter Rubin, a senior editor at WIRED magazine, has worked in the magazine industry for 15 years and came to Whitworth on Tuesday, Nov. 3, to present on the progression of magazines and their conversion to digital format within the past decade.

Rubin’s presentation about his journey in the magazine business attracted students interested in media. Freshman Michaela Mulligan was drawn due to her interest in entering the magazine industry.

“I think [the shift to digital media] is important because we do have smartphones, and it’s a lot easier and quicker to get information and you can do a lot of cool stuff with digital media, like video, and writing, and photography," Mulligan said. "It makes it all look really cool."

After starting out as a fact checker at GQ Magazine, Rubin gained experience while surrounded by well-known writers such as Michael Hainey, author of the memoir “After Visiting Friends,” and even worked with Elizabeth Gilbert, author of “Eat, Pray, Love” on occasion.

Rubin became an editorial assistant for GQ Magazine, and decided he was established enough to become a freelance writer. He wrote for magazines including Elle, XXL, Vibe, The New York Times, Rolling Stone and the TV Guide. After freelancing for a while, Rubin wanted to find a job in an office setting with more people, he said.

Unfortunately, starting in 2007, many magazines began to go out of business. By 2009, a total of 1,684 magazines had ceased publication, due to the financial crisis making print publication difficult, Rubin said. However, the downfall led to the “birth of content,” Rubin said. Media began its shift to the digital age, and the reader’s perception of media and news began to change as well.

His company adopted the tag line “more than a magazine,” to adapt to the transition toward digital content. The change to a new platform began the long process of finding the niche of the magazine industry, for the consumers no longer read the content the same way, Rubin said.

“I’d say that magazines aren’t dead, that there’s new ways to make them appealing like [Rubin] said... how they transferred a lot of stuff online, and redesigned their website so it works well with the magazine,” Mulligan said.

During this transition, Rubin accepted his current position as a senior editor at WIRED, and now covers pop culture and entertainment. That includes topics such as movies and television, music, video games, comic books and “anything else that is absolutely integral to the survival of our species,” according to Rubin’s profile.

Rubin’s work at WIRED includes extensive coverage on virtual reality, as he wrote the magazine’s cover story for the June 2014 issue focusing on the Oculus VR, and the development of the Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display for immersive virtual reality.

Rubin was able to change the method of news writing with what he refers to as the “inverted process.” Instead of months of coverage, he wrote stories as the development continued, becoming the first and the last word on the subject. He became an expert on the new technology, and WIRED was able to get exclusive content on the topic.

Making a magazine is a combination of art, writing, rhythm, wit, but most of all chemistry. Without that spark, the content will fall at, Rubin said. The digital platform has altered how media are displayed and consumed by the readers, but those changes have allowed creativity to blossom. WIRED recently published a story that did not make it into the issue on their Instagram account, breaking up the story into 10 different posts each with a nature shot as the image, Rubin said.

“I think it’s relevant because it shows how what he’s doing reflects trends in other areas of future careers,” Mulligan said. “It’s definitely more geared toward people in journalism or mass communication, but it shows that any eld you go into you have to be ready to do digital things...it’s helpful because everything now includes something digital.”

The media industry is changing, with technology constantly improving and developing, and as platforms and formats change, one thing remains the same: the art of storytelling.

 

Meghan Foulk

Staff Writer

Contact Meghan Foulk at

meghanfoulk19@my.whitworth.edu

"What is a feminist?": Panel put on by the women and gender studies minor discusses what it means to be a feminist

If one uses the word feminist to describe themselves, it means they believe in equal rights for men and women, according to some students, faculty and staff at Whitworth.

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The women and gender studies program held a discussion called “What is a feminist?” with a panel of students, faculty and staff who shared stories of what it meant to them to be a feminist.

English professor LuElla D’Amico, one of five panelists, began the discussion by talking about how she became a feminist.

D'Amico has considered herself a feminist since she was young, but was awoken to the real issues concerning feminism when she took a feminist theory class in college, she said.

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"For me, feminism has become something very personal,” D'Amico said. She struggled with the issue of having to choose whether or not to take her husband's last name when they got married. Some feminists argue about whether or not a woman taking a man’s last name in marriage is considered true equality. She decided to take her husband’s name, but everybody is different and feminism means something different for everyone, D'Amico said.

Junior Emily Thorpe considers herself a feminist. Feminism is about equal rights for men and women, she said. However, there are people who don't actually know what it means to be a feminist and that has given the word a negative connotation and made some people not want to use that label, Thorpe said.

The other panelists, seniors John Hope and Kayla Countryman, campus pastor Mindy Smith and communication studies professor Jim McPherson shared personal stories on how they came to consider themselves feminists.

The panelists also took questions from individuals about feminism and what it means to be a feminist for those with different racial and ethnic identities, as well as questions on individuals who they considered to be their feminist role models.

The word feminist had a negative connotation in the past but it's getting better. But, there's a power balance that some are afraid of, Thorpe said.

"A lot of men are afraid of it because they think it's about women becoming superior to men and being in a higher position, but that's not what is," Thorpe said.

Hope shared his story about growing up in a conservative household. He played sports and even though he was in these traditionally masculine positions, he still felt like he did not fit the masculine ideal. His sisters were encouraged to start a family and raise children while he was not, Hope said. After entering college he realized that being a feminist meant being able to make a choice whether or not to follow tradition, Hope said.

"It's not about hating all these traditional things that we've inherited. It's about being able to choose," Hope said.

Sophomore Kyla Perkins said that she considers herself a feminist.

"When I hear feminism I think of equality, not just for women, but for everybody," Perkins said.

Senior Stephanie Turner also considers herself a feminist and believes that a feminist is a person who believes in the empowerment of women.

"A lot of people see feminism as extreme protesters who riot," Turner said. "That's not what it is. It's about empowerment. I think it's getting better but there's still that stigma. There's still a negative connotation to call yourself a feminist.”

Sophomore Emily Wilson believes that feminism is about equal rights for men and women, but she's hesitant to call herself a feminist, she said.

"I feel like I am and I believe everything feminists do but I don't consider myself one," Wilson said. "I wouldn't go to a feminist rally just because I don't fully know what it means to be a feminist."

Feminism is something that’s personal not just for her, but for everybody, D'Amico said.

While feminism is supposed to include everybody, sometimes that is not the case, Countryman said. Intersectional feminism aims to include voices of those who feel marginalized but the fact that there was to be a distinction from these types of feminism is problematic, she said.

"I think it's wonderful that we can recognize progress and celebrate progress," D'Amico said. "But we haven't made it and we need to constantly be questioning how far we can go."

 

Krystiana Morales

Staff Writer

Contact Krystiana Morales at

kmorales17@my.whitworth.edu