Over 200 students attend Second Chance Prom dance

On Saturday night over 200 Whitworth students traveled to the historic Bozarth Mansion and Retreat Center, to attend “Second Chance Prom.” The event was sponsored by ASWU. The Bozarth Mansion was purchased by Gonzaga University in 1963 and is now an event center. Sophomores Scott Bingham and Madeline Misterek enjoyed the ambiance of the location and the dancing.

“It’s wonderful here, I love the vintage feel of the mansion, and we got to see the sunset right when we got here,” Misterek said. “There are lots of great people, and it’s a fun place because we even got to go outside and dance too.”

The two especially enjoyed getting to dance to the Wobble and the Stanky Leg.

“I like the wobble because there’s already moves, so I don’t have to come up with my own, and I am not very good at dancing so that’s nice,” Misterek said. “We even looked up a YouTube video and our instructor, Randy was his name, taught us how to do the Stanky Leg.”

“We were actually practicing the Stanky Leg just for this night, so we could get our groove on," Bingham said. Bingham and Misterek both hope to see this event or events like it continued on in the future.

“Its nice to have it off campus,  but still close by,” Misterek said.

Freshman Christina Locatelli also attended the dance and enjoyed being at such a unique location with so many people.

“I think it has been fun, there are a lot of people here. I was surprised,” Locatelli said. “It's beautiful, it’s a great location, gorgeous view and gorgeous building.”

The event was planned by several dorm senators and ASWU special events coordinator Bre Lyons. Sophomore and Boppell senator Norma Heredia helped plan and set up for the event.

“It’s so great to see the students having fun, looking beautiful, and especially seeing how the year is going to be over and finals are coming up and the stress level is soon going to go up," Heredia said.

The historic location and the free event attracted many students both from on and off-campus.

“The minute I walked in, all I heard was positive reviews,” Heredia said. "I am just glad to see everybody all dressed up, and looking happy, because that was the original intent.”

Another student integral in planning the dance was sophomore Ballard senator Rachel Henson.

“We realized that students really like having bigger dances and off campus events, especially the on campus students, because they don’t always have opportunities to get off for Whitworth-sponsored events, so a whole group of ASWU dorm senators came together and decided it was something we wanted to do,” Henson said.

There have been off-campus dances in recent years, but this is the first time in three years that “prom” was brought back and the first time having a Whitworth event at the Bozarth Mansion.

Thanks to the work of the dorm senators and Lyons, the event was subsidized by ASWU and was free of charge for students.

 

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

"The Space Between" showcases senior art

Last Tuesday marked the opening day for the 2016 senior exhibition, “The Space Between.” Located in the Bryan Oliver gallery inside of the Lied Arts Center, "The Space Between" exhibit is a compilation of works from Whitworth senior visual art students. The show features a wide variety of projects, including a wire installation, graphic designs, screen prints, paintings, photographs and even an artist book. Before graduating seniors are asked to come up with a final project that reflects both their time at Whitworth and their chosen field of study.

Senior art and psychology major Christina Dobbins prepared a four-panel mixed media work, a painted photograph of a bustling city on canvas. Using a photograph and a gel medium, Dobbins transferred the black and white photo to the canvases and then painted over selected parts of the image with oil paint.

“I am from the San Francisco area, California, so I came up with the idea from some pictures I took of street life when I was home,” Dobbins said. “I really like the busyness of cities, and the diversity of people in them, and so that's where I got the idea.”

Dobbins' work is neither fully a photograph nor fully a painting, but rather it is a unique combination.

Senior Britney Baker chose to share both her love for photography and for her older sister. For her project, she displayed a series of photographs that she took of her sister and her husband titled, “The Story of Them.”

“The pictures on the wall is a storyline of my sister and the few big moments that have happened in her life so far, her getting engaged, her newborn pictures and having her first child.”

Additionally, Baker put together a book of photographs she has taken that the viewer is invited to flip through to experience her style of photography.

“The book is a compilation of all the things I have been recently working on,” Baker said. “I wanted the book to be a product I would be able to show to clients in the future.”

Senior Jeff Skaggs’ work “Aging Process” is made of six similar but slightly different labels on aging bottles of wine, to show the evolution of his knowledge and skills as a graphic design major and his aging process.

“My work...is my reflection on the change throughout my collegiate career, a change as a person, and now I am getting ready to enter the workforce and what we would classify as the ‘real world,’” Skaggs said. “It’s a change and a progression, so it’s an aging process, and that’s why I labeled it that.”

The faculty in the art department work to equip and discuss with their students the reality of life after college, but not without presenting some healthy challenges for them along the way.

Dobbins’ challenge has been juggling a psychology and art major, and trying to navigate life after Whitworth.

“I’m a psychology and art major, so it has been interesting trying to balance the two, and figuring out what I want to do,” Dobbins said. “We have some really good professors, that are always willing to help talk through things and come up with ideas, so that’s been really helpful.”

Growing as an artist and a person at Whitworth has proven to be sometimes difficult for Baker.

“It’s definitely been a bumpy road at times, I have learned a lot about myself,” Baker said. “[The professors] really push you to do your best and they push you sometimes when you don’t want to be pushed, but they do anyways, and I am better artist because of that.”

Skaggs has been challenged to grow his knowledge in areas beyond his major and. “I have felt really happy here at Whitworth,” Skaggs said. “I am really thankful that I didn't just spend all my time dedicated in one specific area, because then I feel like I wouldn’t have had the knowledge and skills to apply other areas into my work.”

The artwork of these seniors and their classmates will be on display in the Bryan Oliver Gallery from now until May 21.

 

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Freshman Jira Hammond interprets senior Annie Feuerstein’s piece titled “Set Time, Face Self”.

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

"Ask a Neighbor" series gives students an opportunity to learn about other faiths

Students gathered Tuesday night in the HUB Multipurpose Room for the “Ask a Neighbor” discussion, an opportunity for students to engage in an interfaith dialogue with Darrell Moseley, Spokane Washington Stake President for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Moseley joined the church at age 18, and has since then become a leader in the church.

Moseley was chosen to be a stake president last June. As a stake president, Moseley is the leader of the Spokane wards, which are congregations grouped together geographically.

The students in attendance asked Moseley questions and listened as he shared the beliefs and practices of his church.

The conversation covered a wide range of topics relevant to the Latter-day Saints faith including ward boundaries, drinking caffeine, gender roles in the church, diversity, missions, scripture and more. One audience member asked Moseley to talk about the temple of their church.

“We look at the temple as another place of worship,” Moseley said. “It’s reserved; not all members of the church can go there, only those who pay the highest devotions to the church, who are in tune with everything the church is doing, obeying all the commandments, and the covenants, are welcome to go in the temple.”

Moseley later explained that temple access is determined through an interview process with a bishop and stake president of the church. Members who meet the requirements are given a temple recommend card, which gives them access to the temple for two years assuming they stay true to the commandments.

“The gospel of Jesus Christ is all about repentance,” Moseley said. “If someone does something wrong that would cause them to lose their temple recommend, they should go to their bishop, who would work through the repentance process with them and get them back their temple recommend.”

The discussion was the first event of the “Know your Neighbors” interfaith dialogue series launched this spring. The series allows Whitworth students to actively engage with people of other faiths from around the Spokane community.

The event is coordinated by Ross Watts, Whitworth director of service learning and community engagement, and campus pastor Mindy Smith.

“One of things that we were interested to do was to create a space on campus where students could learn a little bit about other faiths because that might reduce some of the fear of the unknown,” Watts said.

The long-term plan for the series is that students will begin with “Ask a Neighbor,” which are on-campus discussions with people of other faiths from churches around the Spokane community, and then attend “Meet your Neighbors,” events with the Spokane Interfaith Council, which offers open houses at places of worship around Spokane, and then finally “Be a Neighbor,” which would ask students to complete a service project with people of different faiths.

“The series is a set of opportunities for Whitworth students to engage with somebody from a different faith and become comfortable around them,” Watts said. The next “Ask a Neighbor” discussion will be Tuesday, April 19, at 8 a.m. in the HUB chambers. Students will have the chance to speak with Amer Ahmed, an intercultural diversity consultant, about his Islamic faith.

 

Contact Kailee Carneau at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

"Enchanted April" has successful opening weekend

This weekend marked the kick off of Whitworth Theatre’s spring production, “Enchanted April.” The play is a romantic comedy, centered around two housewives from London who vacation in Italy. As the story unfolds, the two of them get more out of the vacation than either could have anticipated. Performances were on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. The Friday showing was incorporated into Whitworth’s semi-annual Faculty Development Day. The faculty joined one another for dinner and were invited to see the show altogether Friday evening. Many of the faculty stayed to enjoy the show along with other members of the community, and Whitworth students.

Amongst the crowd was Stacy Keogh-George, assistant professor of sociology.

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“It was great, the set was beautiful, the students did an amazing job,” Keogh-George said.

The two main characters, Lottie Wilkins and Rose Arbuthnot, are played by juniors Michela Munoz and Alanna Hamilton.

“It was funny, there were parts that were really sad, the characters had really sad stories to tell, so it was fun to see them develop throughout the play,” George said. “I got really involved with a couple of the characters, they did a great job connecting with the audience.”

Many hours of design and practice have been put into the production. Typically, the cast has been rehearsing six days a week, for three to four hours a day, since the start of spring term. Aaron Dyszelski, a fifth year professor of theater design and tech, has been one of the many people putting a lot of time in to help bring the play to fruition. Dyszelski is heading up costume and set design for “Enchanted April.”

“I think it’s not a well known-script, so people aren’t sure what to expect, but it’s got a little bit of everything, it’s funny, there some serious moments, Dyszelski said. “All the characters are real people dealing with real problems.”

The production is guest directed by Jadd Davis, Artistic Director for Coeur d'Alene Summer Theatre. This is his first production with Whitworth, but he has acted and directed on many other occasions for local theaters.

The show’s final weekend  is March 11 and 12. The show will start at 7:30 p.m. both evenings in Cowles Auditorium and runs about two hours. Whitworth students get in free with student I.D.

Kailee Carneau

Staff Writer

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

The writer's life

Junior Josh Tuttle, an English major on the writing and literature tracks and computer science minor, has been passionate about writing from a young age. After learning the alphabet as a child, Tuttle used to type on his family's old typewriter. “I have always wanted to be a writer; the problem was when you’re a little kid, the challenge of being a writer isn’t necessarily the writing, it’s having something to say,” Tuttle said. “I didn’t have anything to say, because I hadn’t had the right experiences to have anything to say.”

Tuttle has come a long way since his typewriter days and over time has found many things to say. “Eventually I got older, and you both get more life experiences, and with practice, you get more facility with language and writing, and mental stamina,” Tuttle said.

Last year, Tuttle won the Washington Consortium for the Liberal Arts essay contest and will have one of his short stories published in an anthology entitled “Songs of My Selfie,” a collection of 17 short stories by millennial fiction writers.

“I had always wanted to get a short story published and I hadn’t been able to yet, so that was why I was so excited to hear that it was going to be published," Tuttle said.

Tuttle’s soon-to-be published short story is a fictional work; however, that may not be the writing style he continues to pursue.

“I feel a bit unmoored right now,” Tuttle said. “I sort of stumbled upon creative non-fiction, and I think that will probably end up being more of my thing. That does make me a little sad, because I really wanted to be a fiction writer, but I've discovered that I like creative non-fiction more.”

Before coming to Whitworth, Tuttle served in the army for two and a half years, where he worked as an Abrams crewman and a Stryker Mobile Gun System crewman.

“I picked up a book when I was in the Army called "Reading Like a Writer," by a woman named Francine Pros,” Tuttle said. “I picked it up and it sounded interesting, because I had always wanted to be a writer. The book was fantastic, and that was the first time that I ever really felt like I could see the path forward.”

After the Army, Tuttle attended De Anza community college (CA), where his writing professor, Charles Gray, reminded him of how much he enjoyed being in an English class environment.

“I loved the environment so much,” Tuttle said. “Without that experience, I really don’t think that I would have had the necessary insight to want to come to a place like Whitworth, where I would be in a good place to explore that side of things, so I owe a lot to him.”

After attending De Anza, Tuttle eventually transferred to Whitworth, where he was drawn to the English department.

“I came to Whitworth to be a computer science major, because I wanted to work for Microsoft,” Tuttle said. “I also wanted to explore the writing side [of myself], and I figured my opportunity to do that would be better served at a liberal arts university than some state school. And I was right. Our writing program, on the creative writing side, is just fantastic.”

There has been no single person of inspiration for Tuttle, but rather a whole department of support.

“Our professors are so supportive and so wonderful, after coming from places like the Army and De Anza College,” Tuttle said. “Just the personal relationships with these professors, I don’t think I could name anyone in [Whitworth’s] English department, that I haven’t had something like that with.”

“Songs of My Selfie,” the anthology featuring Tuttle’s short story, will be available in print by April 5.

 

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

Understanding the refugee crisis

Whitworth students and other members of the Spokane community filled the Robinson Teaching Theatre last Wednesday night for a Q&A panel discussion centered around the topic of the Syrian refugee crisis.The panel consisted of six individual panelists, each bringing different perspectives on the issue and different levels of experience with refugees. Three of the panelists work with World Relief, an organization that helps settle and integrate refugees after they arrive in a new country. Among them were professor of political science and environmental studies at Gonzaga University Jon Isacoff and sociology professor Raja Tanas. The final panelist sharing her insight was Bushra Alshalah, a civil engineer and refugee from Iraq. The event was organized by senior Juliana Zajicek, who wanted to provide an opportunity for open dialogue around the subject. “There is a lot of hype and commotion right now about Syria, the Middle East and the refugee crisis,” Zajicek said. “I really wanted to carve out a space for our community to talk about it.” The session began with a brief introduction on what the Syrian refugee crisis is and how it affects people by Myron Jespersen, the Middle East program director for World Relief. “The one takeaway I hope that you have, if you don’t understand the situation already, is that it is an incredibly complex situation and there isn’t a simple fix,”  Jespersen said. Each panelist opened with a description of themselves and the aspects of the Middle Eastern refugee crisis that are important to them. Alshalah spoke of her transition from Iraq to the United States. “It’s a big risk to stay there, and a big challenge to come here,” Alshalah said. “My decision [was] to come here, to be more safe and to protect my family.” Mark Kadel, director of Spokane's World Relief office, followed up with some statistics on refugees. “Out of nearly 20 million refugees in the world today, the United States resettles less than one half of one percent,” Kadel said. “The average length of time that a refugee is in a refugee camp, before having an opportunity for a solution is 17 years.” The rest of the time was left open for the audience to ask the panelists questions about the crisis and the work World Relief is doing in Spokane. One audience member asked how big a community needs to be and what resources it needs in order to sustain Middle Eastern refugees. “How many? Well, if you drive between Spokane and Seattle, how many communities do you meet?" Tanas said. "There’s Ritzville, there’s Moses Lake, Ellensburg, and the rest of Washington state is vacant." Washington has the space and resources to accept refugees, Tanas said. Kadel followed up Tanas’s comment with some information on the government regulations on refugees. “This year, because of the staggering refugee crisis around the world, the greatest crisis since World War II, Obama set that cap at 85,000 [refugees], and out of that 85,000, up to 10,000 of them can be from the country of Syria,” Kadel said. World Relief and other like-minded organizations have petitioned the state and national governments to increase the number of foreign refugees to be over 85,000. Several panel members mentioned education was a key step toward both alleviating the crisis and correcting any misconceptions people may have about it. “I think the answer to your question is education,” Tanas said. “Education, information, there’s so much misinformation via the media, the social media especially, and our leaders, some of them give us false information.” Kadel had similar sentiments about education. “The best thing to do is to educate yourselves and make sure you are giving the right information when you’re having discussions with people,” Kadel said. Those interested in knowing more about World Relief or working with them locally in and around Spokane should contact Johnna Nickoloff at jnickoloff@wr.org or visit www.worldrelief.org/spokane. Those interested in learning more about the Middle East should contact the Middle East Club, which is open to new members. For more information about Middle East Club, contact Catherine Rishmawi at crishmawi18@whitworth.edu.

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

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Contact Kailee Carneau at kcarneau@my.whitworth.edu

Living with autism

Students, faculty, local educators and community members gathered in Cowles Auditorium on Friday for a collaborative presentation titled “The World Needs All Kinds of Minds,” hosted by Whitworth’s Center for Gifted Education and the university’s special education department. Among the five presenters was autism and animal welfare activist, Temple Grandin, Ph.D.The main focus of the event was to “provide strategies and practices to address the range of diverse needs of students,” according to event posters. Specifically, the presentation focused on twice-exceptional students: “students who are cognitively advanced, yet their talents may be overlooked due to a disability-often ADHD or an autism spectrum disorder,” according to the event posters. “Temple is coming to provide educators knowledge about the ways that other kinds of kids think, [because] sometimes we think they think all alike, in the same way, and they don’t, and what she worries about is that students sometimes who are on the [autism] spectrum won’t have their talent developed, and many of them will have talent areas that they absolutely adore," said Jann Leppien, the Margo Long Chair of gifted education and event coordinator. “Rather than fixing the child, putting a focus on the strength of the child. So that’s really what the conference is about for educators. The why is to bring recognition to the neurodiversity of the mind.” Grandin is currently a professor at Colorado State University, and remains an active advocate for both animal welfare and students with disabilities. As an individual with autism, Temple presented her perspective on helping students who are on the spectrum, and the value of all different kinds of minds. “Different kinds of people have different kinds of skills, like some people are visual thinkers–they’re very good at art and design,” Grandin said. “Other people are more the engineering and mathematical minded. You take a product like the iPhone: Steve jobs was an artist; he designed the interface, the more mathematically inclined engineers had to make it work, so when you swipe this and swipe this, it would actually work. That’s an example of needing the different kinds of minds.” Approximately 300 educators came from around the Spokane area, and 250 students and faculty signed up for the day-long event. Grandin also spoke Friday evening, at North Central High School to a crowd of about 500 people. This presentation was called “Helping Different Kinds of Minds Be Successful.” “This is really about different kinds of minds and how they can be successful and the focus is on families, who have kids on the spectrum, and how to help their child be successful,” Leppien said. The Robinson Teaching Theatre was filled to capacity for Grandin’s final presentation, “Understanding Animal Behavior.” Approximately 250 people came to listen to Grandin speak. Among them were local farmers, cattlemen, FFA (Future Farmers of America) and 4-H kids. In two days, over 1,000 people heard Grandin present. “The reason she is so doggone popular is she is one of the very first people that spoke out about being on the [autism] spectrum, and being bright, and that it is not such a disability, it’s actually a gift,” Leppien said. Grandin and Leppien first met at a conference 20 years ago where Leppien was speaking about kids advanced for their grade and Grandin was speaking about children on the autism spectrum. Since then, Leppien has invited Grandin to numerous conferences. Leppien works in Whitworth’s Center for Gifted education, which works with students, educators and the university’s special education department to navigate the complexities of students who are on the spectrum or have disabilities, but are also very bright. “Life is too hard to have people beating us up for what we can’t do,” Leppien said. “I’d rather we spend our time on what we can do, and so we have a tendency to be very strengths-based, what are you good at, what do you love, make that your life goal.” Grandin mentioned the tendency for people to look at what others can’t do repeatedly during “The World Needs all Different Kinds of Minds”. “I want you thinking about this; people get too hung up on the labels, the words of the label,” Grandin said. “We've got to start looking at what a kid can do. I want to see kids be everything that they can be, we've got to emphasize what the kid can do, build up on areas of strengths.” “My favorite overarching theme of her presentation was getting rid of the labels, and just really practicing inclusion, thinking more about the individual, instead of their diagnosis,” junior elementary education major Kendall Todd said. Grandin discussed the different types of thinking and processing. She discussed bottom-up versus top-down processing, auditory versus visual thinkers, and best practices for teaching. “I sometimes see way too much of that in education; they want to ram every kid into the same theory and that doesn’t work,” Grandin said. “You see the thing is, one size doesn’t fit all. I want to see kids that think differently, to be successful and get into good careers.” There are many resources available online for people looking for more information about Grandin and her work. Grandin has also written books, her most recent book being “The Autistic Brain,” which talks about the neurological differences of people with autism and how to best nourish those differences. Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Contact Kailee Carneau at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu