Making the decision to not attend parties does not include judging those who do attend

I do not know the first thing about party etiquette, but it is not fair to assume I would judge anyone because they do party.

Recently, my friends invited me to a Halloween party they were hosting. I was put off when someone asked me if I was uncomfortable with their partying. Another asked me: “Do you judge me for partying?” I asked her why she thought I would judge her. She told me how she thought I was uncomfortable with her partying because I do not drink or party like everyone else she knew.

No, I will not judge you. You have a right to do whatever you want, but it is a personal choice of mine not to party. My opinion about partying is different from other people's, but it should not be an issue or affect the friendships I have.

It was never in my best interest in high school to go out and party. My best friends and I devoted our weekend nights to watching movies, going out to eat and having deep conversations which continued late into the night. We never thought about partying because we did not want to drink or talk to people from school who we barely knew. Even if I were to go to one, I would not know the first thing about party protocol. Not everyone has the mindset partying is bad. It can be a great way to meet new people and form relationships.

Personally, I choose not to party because I think there are other ways to have fun. There should not be an automatic assumption I will judge someone because they choose to party. If people do not judge me for my lack of partying, then it is safe to assume I will not judge them because of their partying.

 

Skyler Noble

Columnist

Whitworthianopinion@gmail.com

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