Over 200 students attend Second Chance Prom dance

On Saturday night over 200 Whitworth students traveled to the historic Bozarth Mansion and Retreat Center, to attend “Second Chance Prom.” The event was sponsored by ASWU. The Bozarth Mansion was purchased by Gonzaga University in 1963 and is now an event center. Sophomores Scott Bingham and Madeline Misterek enjoyed the ambiance of the location and the dancing.

“It’s wonderful here, I love the vintage feel of the mansion, and we got to see the sunset right when we got here,” Misterek said. “There are lots of great people, and it’s a fun place because we even got to go outside and dance too.”

The two especially enjoyed getting to dance to the Wobble and the Stanky Leg.

“I like the wobble because there’s already moves, so I don’t have to come up with my own, and I am not very good at dancing so that’s nice,” Misterek said. “We even looked up a YouTube video and our instructor, Randy was his name, taught us how to do the Stanky Leg.”

“We were actually practicing the Stanky Leg just for this night, so we could get our groove on," Bingham said. Bingham and Misterek both hope to see this event or events like it continued on in the future.

“Its nice to have it off campus,  but still close by,” Misterek said.

Freshman Christina Locatelli also attended the dance and enjoyed being at such a unique location with so many people.

“I think it has been fun, there are a lot of people here. I was surprised,” Locatelli said. “It's beautiful, it’s a great location, gorgeous view and gorgeous building.”

The event was planned by several dorm senators and ASWU special events coordinator Bre Lyons. Sophomore and Boppell senator Norma Heredia helped plan and set up for the event.

“It’s so great to see the students having fun, looking beautiful, and especially seeing how the year is going to be over and finals are coming up and the stress level is soon going to go up," Heredia said.

The historic location and the free event attracted many students both from on and off-campus.

“The minute I walked in, all I heard was positive reviews,” Heredia said. "I am just glad to see everybody all dressed up, and looking happy, because that was the original intent.”

Another student integral in planning the dance was sophomore Ballard senator Rachel Henson.

“We realized that students really like having bigger dances and off campus events, especially the on campus students, because they don’t always have opportunities to get off for Whitworth-sponsored events, so a whole group of ASWU dorm senators came together and decided it was something we wanted to do,” Henson said.

There have been off-campus dances in recent years, but this is the first time in three years that “prom” was brought back and the first time having a Whitworth event at the Bozarth Mansion.

Thanks to the work of the dorm senators and Lyons, the event was subsidized by ASWU and was free of charge for students.

 

Kailee Carneau Staff Writer

Contact Kailee at kcarneau17@my.whitworth.edu

Poetry and Pie: Students gathered for a night of pie and self-expression

The coffee shop opened to students and faculty ready to share stanzas and dessert on Nov. 13 . Students shared their work, with topics ranging from grandfathers to Italian plums to small moments that would be otherwise forgotten.

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On Friday evening students gathered in the Mind and Hearth to share their thoughts and ideas through poetry. Along with poetry, the event hosted by English department club Westminster Round featured blueberry, apple and pumpkin pie.

Senior Hannah Cobb has attended Poetry and Pie three times prior to this year, and has always enjoyed hearing what peers and faculty read, she said.

This year, she read her poetry aloud for the rst time at the event.

“[Reading] was terrifying," Cobb said. I had never done this before...this is me kind of forcing myself out of my comfort zone a little bit to share it.”

Cobb draws inspiration for her poems through moments she notices, she said. Poetry and Pie is a time for her not just to express her thoughts, but to hear everyone else’s, she said.

“I just love hearing what everyone else is thinking,” Cobb said. “I think poems are such an honest re ection of yourself and who you are and what’s going on in your brain.”

Some of the poets touched on serious subjects, but other works brought laughter to the coffee shop. One such poem by English professor Fred Johnson expressed a list of 10 situations a possum might find itself in, which had students chuckling all the way through.

The event also featured poet Cathy Bobb, wife of English professor Vic Bobb, who shared a handful of poems reflecting on tragedies in her life and on her family’s struggles with mental illness.

Freshman Ainsley Detwiler attended the event, and liked Cathy Bobb’s work for the background and depth that she put into her poetry, along with the eerie feeling Detwiler got after hearing some of the poems, Detwiler said. Cathy Bobb’s work also features a favorite, titled “The Politics of Pie,” where Cathy Bobb makes a pie for her family, but continuously eats it, making up excuses for each new helping.

Detwiler was also impressed by the unintimidating atmosphere the audience created.

“It was really relaxed...the people surrounding were very nonjudgmental, if anything they were really encouraging,” Detwiler said. “It was all around very welcoming and cozy and supportive.”

 

Meghan Foulk

Staff Writer

Contact Meghan Foulk at

meghanfoulk19@my.whitworth.edu

Painted pumpkins embody Fall spirit

Pumpkins of all shapes and sizes filled the tables in the HUB Multipurpose Room. Ranging from short and squat to long and oblong, some full of warts and others that fit neatly into the palm of a hand.

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All of the pumpkins were grown in the Kipos garden near Whitworth off Lola Lane.

On Friday, Oct. 9, the Kipos Garden hosted a pumpkin painting gathering at 6 p.m., which was quickly filled with students painting pumpkins with various characters, Halloween motifs or simply creative designs.

The garden, which is run by student volunteers, produces beans, pumpkins, squash, various tomatoes and tomatillos, apples, asparagus, kale, Swiss chard, sunflowers, and many different kinds of herbs such as fennel, dill, mint, parsley and taro.

Sophomore Shelby Beedle painted her pumpkin as Frankenstein due to a small scar on the surface.

Beedle was excited to paint, but was also enthusiastic about the cause.

“It’s really exciting to see the Kipos garden getting involved in campus and being on campus, where we can come and support them, and the money stays here so that’s really nice,” Beedle said.

Senior Kiersten Signalness organized the event, and has been involved with Kipos and is the ASWU Sustainability Coordinator.

“I really want people to realize that the Kipos garden exists, and that we actually have a lot of produce. So why not make it available to the public?” Signalness said.

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Students were free to bring their own pumpkins to the event, but the ones from the garden were sold at the event for people to paint. The money will go toward the garden and the Kipos club, Signalness said.

“Yeah, I told our garden manager that since [the pumpkins] came from the garden, I would love to raise money for the garden,” Signalness said. “Maybe we

can brainstorm towards putting it toward Kipos, because Kipos is becoming a club this year.”

The group began as a club and, despite not being one last year, they are currently going through the process to become a club once more.

The Kipos garden reaches out through little events such as this, but also does other things to get involved in the community.

When there is surplus produce, like apples, Kipos takes them to Sodexo so that it can be used in some of the food, Signalness said.

Kipos is also working with organizations such as Second Harvest, a hunger-relief organization, and The Campus Kitchens Project, which is a program that provides meals for low- income families. They donate extra produce to these organizations.

Anyone who comes to help on a garden workday can leave with produce, as there is so much produce that they do not want to go to waste, Signalness said.

Junior Brittany Boring commented on how the event was a good way to bring awareness to the Kipos program.

“I think that the more that students see the things from the garden on campus...the more awareness can grow about the garden,” Boring said.

For students who are interested in learning more about Kipos, they meet Saturdays from 9:30-11 a.m., and can receive updates on the Kipos Facebook page.

 

Meghan Foulk

Staff Writer

Contact Meghan Foulk at

meghanfoulk19@my.whitworth.edu

Annual Freshman Fall Fest attracts all grades

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Students from dorms all across campus gathered in and around Baldwin-Jenkins and Stewart hall for Freshman Fall Fest. The Saturday, Oct. 10 event hosted dancing, a puppy Prime Time and a photo booth complete with Christmas lights.

Freshman Fall Fest, a second annual harvest festival put on by freshman dorms Baldwin-Jenkins, Stewart and The Village, took place from 7-10 p.m. in the lounges and outside of the dorms.

While the event is open to all on-campus students, the target audience is primarily freshman.

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“The name itself is enough to say it’s a freshman event. It helps enrich the freshman community,” StewVille senator Jeff Debray said.

The process of planning the event took about three weeks, Debray said. Debray and Baldwin-Jenkins senator Brendan Finch worked together to plan the event.

The leadership teams from the freshman dorms were also integrated into the process, Debray said. Members of the Baldwin-Jenkins and StewVille leadership teams helped facilitate a puppy prime time and dance session for students who attended the event.

Although the event was targeted towards freshmen, students from other years attended. Freshman Emily Boettcher and Mallory Beane, residents of Baldwin-Jenkins, attended the event with friends and were excited to see the puppies.

“We all got some puppy therapy,” freshman Boettcher said. “It was great.” Even with rain and wind, freshmen gathered in front of Baldwin-Jenkins to show off their dance moves and swing dance skills. Food and drinks were provided inside of Stewart, where students chatted, ate caramel apples and sipped on apple cider.

“The caramel apples were a smash,” Boettcher said. “I loved them.”

Along with music and food, the event included activities such as croquet outside of Stewart, sack races and relay games.

“This event is really building community between the dorms,” freshman Mallory Beane said, “I don’t know half of the people here.”

Beane and other students agreed that the event was great and that the apple cider and caramel apples were great. The activities and dancing was a great way for freshmen from all the dorms to come together, Beane said.

“This is the first time all of the freshman dorms have been together,” Beane said. “It’s pretty cool.”

 

Krystiana Morales

Staff Writer

Contact Krystiana Morales at

kmorales17@my.whitworth.edu