‘Script’ lit journal extends creative outlet to students

Sometimes during college, under the weight of science textbooks, analyses and piles of scholarly writing, students need and crave a creative outlet. In its 22nd year, Script, Whitworth’s student literary arts journal, provides students with just that.

Published annually at the end of each school year, Script contains student-submitted fiction, non-fiction, art, drama and poetry.

It is open to anyone enrolled at Whitworth who wants their work published.

The journal is funded by one of the English department’s donors, said Annie Stillar, program assistant for the English department.

But English majors are not the only ones submitting to the journal, said junior Diana Cater, assistant managing editor of Script.

“We have people from all academic backgrounds submitting their work,” Cater said.

She said Script is inspiring because it helps Whitworth artists realize they aren’t alone.

“Something really wonderful happens when you realize you are in a community of artists,” Cater said. “It’s really inspiring to say, ‘Hey, I’m surrounded by all of these really talented people.’”

Once submitted, the work is reviewed by a group of editors.

The editors determine what makes the work “good” as well as how it can be improved.

“What we’re really looking for is either people who just have a really solid craft and their writing is beautiful, and also students who are using innovative forms,” Jacquelyn Wheeler, senior and student editor of Script said.

Work can then be revised by the author and resubmitted. It becomes a learning process for both the editors and authors.

“We’re learning how to be editors, you’re learning how to be writers,” according to the Script Lit Journal Facebook page. “You help us by submitting, we want to help you, too.”

Many students submitted this year and Script is publishing a book with 170 pages of student work, including more art than has been seen in previous years, Wheeler said.

“Jacquie and I believe a thick journal is better than a thin one,” Cater said.

However, that does not mean quality was compromised. More than 20 editors worked on the journal to ensure that every piece of work was worth publishing.

While some works were rejected from the publication, authors can still learn from the editors’ critiques.

“You still get feedback and that’s a really important experience,” Cater said. “Keep writing and find ways to improve your craft.”

This year’s publication comes out on May 4. There is a Script Reading to celebrate its release by the Campanile (if it is raining it will be held in the HUB MPR) at 4 p.m.

Anyone published in Script is welcome to read their work at the ceremony and attendees can get a free journal.

“It’s pretty well attended every year,” Stillar said. “It is usually attended by about 70 to 100 people and it usually lasts about an hour.”

Next year, students interested in becoming an editor for Script should keep their eyes open during the fall for when the informational meeting will be held. Previous experience is not required as plenty of it will be gained from becoming part of the staff.

Submissions will be accepted starting in the fall.

 

Story by Nerissa Kresge Staff Writer

Photo courtesy of: Jacquelyn Wheeler

 

Contact Nerissa Kresge at nkresge12@my.whitworth.edu.

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