Jake Decker Values Time in Spokane

Freshman Jake Decker was no stranger to the Spokane area when he began his first day of college at Whitworth University this past fall.  He graduated from Spokane’s Mead High School, but has lived in five different states, and carries a little bit of each place along with him. With a heavy interest in athletics, one would be hard-pressed to find a sports fan as distinctive as Jake.  Decker’s list of favorite teams includes the Boston Red Sox, Colorado Avalanche, Kansas Jayhawks, Michigan State Spartans, and St. Louis Rams.  But he didn’t pick these teams out of a hat.

Decker has lived in Michigan, Maine, Colorado, Washington, and most recently Missouri.  At each stop along the way, he has picked up at least one local team to root for.

When asked about his favorite location of the five, Decker went with Spokane.

“It’s the most vivid in my mind, and the people here are second to none,” he said.

When his family moved from Spokane to Missouri at the end of his senior year, Decker was posed with a tough college decision.  After considering leaving Spokane for William Jewell College in Missouri or the University of Kansas, Decker decided to stay and attend Whitworth.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that I made the right decision,” he said.  He loves the tight-knit community and students.  Jake has already immersed himself in the flow of campus life, playing intramural basketball and soccer while also joining a small group and playing saxophone in Jazz II.

This semester Jake is taking Intro to Athletic Training, and has decided to major in Athletic Training.  He also intends on completing Theology and Spanish minors.

And his travels may not be done yet.  After enjoying a trip to Europe with members of his senior class at Mead, Decker is already considering returning to Europe to study abroad.  But no matter where his travels take him; he values Spokane as an important and influential stop along the away.

Story by Andrew Forhan

Photo by Becca Eng

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